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List of Translated Titles

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FIABE E STORIE COREANE

  • Author

  • Translator

    Maurizio Riotto
  • Publisher

    Franco Muzzio Editore
  • Published Year

    2021
  • Genre

    literature > Korean Literature > Complete Collection, Library > Complete Collection & Library (more than 2 writers)
  • Original Title

    한국 민담집
  • ISBN

    9788874132799
  • Page

    296
  • Language

    Italian

Website

Total 444

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  • Yisroel Roll / yisroelroll@gmail.com

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  • Ecole de Seoul: How artists, writers survived dark ages through friendship

    In the early 20th century, Korea was under Japanese colonial rule, which is generally considered as a time of darkness and despair. However, art and literature never stopped blossoming despite the troubled times, as artists and writers gathered at cafes and bars and shared communion in search of a new era.Installation view of "Encounters Between Korean Art and Literature in the Modern Age" featuring first editions of modern Korean literature at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Deoksugung / Courtesy of MMCA"Encounters Between Korean Art and Literature in the Modern Age," an exhibition at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA), Deoksugung, looks into how artists and writers shared the spirit of the times and navigated the colonial era together.MMCA director Youn Bum-mo said the exhibit highlights the priceless legacies left by modern artists and writers who challenged the times with their visions."This exhibition invites audiences into a new world as envisioned by the featured artists and writers, who lived lives that were rich in terms of unprecedented intellectual affluence even during a time marked by poverty and contradicting values," Youn said.From rare first editions of Korean modern literature, such as an original copy of Kim So-wol's poetry collection "Azaleas," to Korea's pioneering abstract artist Kim Whan-ki's poetic paintings and letters, some 140 artworks and 200 bibliographic materials are on view at the museum.The exhibit centers on life in colonial Seoul, known back then as Gyeongseong, in the 1930s and 1940s, when Koreans were experiencing and absorbing modernity.Cho Young-bok, a professor at the Division of Northeast Asia Cultural Industries at Kwangwoon University who specializes in modern Korean literature, said she focused on how literature reflects and criticizes the present era while raising expectations for the future. "We typically think that literary works reflect the period at the time of writing. However, as I researched poems and novels under Japanese colonial rule for this exhibition, I wondered how such splendid works were created during the dark times. Maybe art and culture look to the future, not just reflecting the era," Cho said.Cho sought the origin of hallyu, or the Korean wave, from the accumulation of culture including collaborations between artists and writers."Great culture does not pop up all of a sudden, but is a result of accumulation. Rediscovering Korea's modern culture will provide us with insight into the worldwide popularity of Korean culture now," Cho said.Gu Bon-ung "Still Life with a Doll" (1937) / Courtesy of MMCAThe first section, "Confluence of the Avant-garde," introduces artists and writers who were embracing new concepts and ways of thinking as they stood on the front lines of an era when traditional Korean values collided with new philosophies and cultures from the West.Hwang Jeong-su's "Twelve Thousand Peaks of Modern Geumgang," which was featured on the cover of the July 1933 issue of popular magazine, "Byeolgeongon," provides a kaleidoscope view of the era in a mountain with a Paramount movie theater, cafe, bar, a field of honor, chapel and even a place for suicide."This shows a slice of society in the 1930s. What is interesting is that many socio-pathological issues seen today also existed back then. Considering that it was an era when Western concepts and ways of thinking were being introduced, the culture shock might have been much bigger than what is being felt now," said Kim In-hye, a curator who organized the exhibit.Poet Yi Sang, known for his avant-garde and experimental poems, opened Coffeehouse Jebi (Korean word for swallow) in 1934, decorated with a gloomy portrait of Yi and Fauvist-style works by his friend, painter Gu Bon-ung. The place soon became a popular hangout for both artists and writers. "Poet Yi liked the music of Mischa Elman, so he had a phonograph at the coffeehouse to listen to his violin concerto," Kim said. "Gu Bon-ung's Still Life with a Doll was hung at Yi's cafe and later rediscovered in the 1970s after it was sold along with the coffeehouse."Yi was best known as a poet. But he was also a graphic designer and created illustrations for some novels. "His illustrations were experimental, just like his literary works. For example, he produced a collage of images inspired by words and overlapped them to reinterpret the text through image," Kim said.Along with the vibrant modern works, Yee Soo-kyung pays tribute to the rich culture of that era by creating a crystal bead blind installation with a peacock pattern, inspired by an album of paintings gifted to writer Cho Pung-youn's wedding on the MMCA's commission. Another creation of Yee's, "Moonlight Crown_Toy Bride of Poet Yi Sang," was inspired by Yi's 1936 poem."The avant-garde atmosphere of the times was influenced the early works of Yoo Young-kuk and Kim Whan-ki, such as Rondo," Kim said.Installation view of "Encounters Between Korean Art and Literature in the Modern Age" featuring illustrations for newspaper novels from the 1920s to 1940s at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Deoksugung / Courtesy of MMCAThe second gallery, themed "A Museum Built from Paper," is different from a typical art exhibition featuring paintings. Instead, the gallery is full of illustrations from writings serialized in newspapers and magazines, displayed in a mood reminiscent of a library. "Hwamun" was a new genre introduced in literary magazines where painters provided images matching poems. The top book designer and illustrator of the time, Jung Hyeon-woong, provided illustrations for Baek Seok's poem, "Me, Natasha and the White Donkey," capturing the verse's exotic atmosphere using a simple style. Also on display are 33 rare first editions of modern Korean literature. "Most Koreans know these poems and novels from school textbooks, but it will be the first time for them to actually see the first editions up close," curator Kim said. Some of the notable books are Kim So-wol's "Azaleas" and Yun Dong-ju's "Sky, Wind and Stars.""Only 100 copies of Baek Seok's Deer were published at the poet's expense and Yun Dong-ju had to transcribe the book since he couldn't own a copy. Kim Ki-rim's Weather Chart was designed by poet and designer Yi Sang. The sleek black cover with silver foil looks modern even in the 21st century," Kim said.Jung Hyeon-woong's illustration on Baek Seok's poem "Me, Natasha and the White Donkey" (1938) / Courtesy of Adan MungoThe third section, "Fellowship of Artists and Writers in the Modern Age," delves into the relationships between artists and writers and gives visitors an idea of how the unions caused sparks to fly.Curator Kim said looking into the collaboration between artists and writers broadens one's perspective in understanding both art and literature.Painter Chang Pal, who was the first to paint Western-style religious artworks in Korea, was close with poet Jeong Ji-yong and provided illustrations for her poems. Poet Kim Ki-rim, who was a reporter for the Chosun Ilbo, got to know Lee Yeo-seong, then editor of the social affairs desk and brother of painter Lee Que-de. Lee later provided images to Kim's works as a painter.Novelist Lee Tae-jun maintained a close relationship with Kim Yong-jun after getting to know each other when they both studied in Tokyo. Kim designed most of Lee's books as a result of their friendship. "Kim Kwang-gyun is a poet adhering to the school of imagism and was at the center of a network of poets and painters including Lee Jung-seop, Kim Whan-ki and Ku Sang. He owned a Kim Whan-ki painting, Moonlit Night, which was presented in a 1951 exhibition. It is presumed that Kim Kwang-gyun, who was the richest among the group, took over the unsold painting from Kim Whan-ki," curator Kim explained.Lee Jung-seop's "Family of Poet Ku Sang" shows a dark time in the artist's life, separated from his family and residing in Ku's house. His yearning for his family is presented in the painting depicting the members of the house in which he was living.Kim Whan-ki's "Moonlit Night" (1951) / Courtesy of MMCA"Writings and Paintings by Literary Artists," the fourth and final section, offers a glimpse into literary works of artists primarily known as painters. Kim Yong-jun, known for his essays, also offered his skills to ink-and-color painting. "Ten-panel Folding Screen with Still Life" is an example of how the artist incorporated modern elements into the traditional style. Chun Kyung-ja is best known for her paintings of female figures, but she also wrote many realistic and honest essays as well as her autobiography. She also produced illustrations for the covers of novels and poems.Kim Whan-ki left many poems attached to his paintings in addition to his famous dot paintings and cultivated friendships with writers of the time. "Kim Whan-ki's artwork, Where, in What From, Shall We Meet Again, is titled after a phrase from his friend Kim Kwang-sup's poem, In the Evening, after receiving mistaken information that Kim Kwang-sup passed away. This became the only Kim Whan-ki dot painting with a title," curator Kim said.On a wall are over 50 covers of "Hyundae Munhak" (contemporary literature) magazine from its inaugural January 1955 issue to the July 1987 issue, featuring the artworks of Kim Whan-ki, Chun Kyung-ja, Chang Uc-chin and Han Mook. These are part of the 1,916 issues of the magazine donated to the MMCA by Hanyang University Paiknam Library. "The series of cover illustrations showcase changes in artists' styles. Illustrating covers of literary magazines was an important source of income for the artists. For instance, Kim Whan-ki supported his mother and daughters through cover illustrations when he left for Paris and New York," the curator said. "Unfortunately, the original paintings do not exist now as they were thrown away after printing the covers."The exhibit runs through May 30. Reservations are required to visit the museum according to COVID-19 safety measures. Covers of "Hyundae Munhak" (contemporary literature) magazine from January 1955 to July 1987, featuring artworks by Kim Whan-ki, Chun Kyung-ja, Chang Uc-chin and Han Mook / Courtesy of MMCA

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  • 'Please Look After Mom' author vows to 'write on' following plagiarism row

    ​​SEOUL, March 3 (Yonhap) -- Shin Kyung-sook, the author of the Korean bestseller "Please Look After Mom," said Wednesday she will continue to "write on" in her first public appearance in six years after a plagiarism scandal."I will write on with new pieces while carrying the heavy burden of my past faults and negligence on my back," Shin said in an online press conference Wednesday. It was held in line with the publication of her new novel whose title roughly translatesto "I had gone to my father."The media event marked her first public appearance since 2015, when she was accused of copying passages from the Korean translation of "Patriotism" (1961) by the late Japanese writer Yukio Mishima in one of her short stories.Shin initially denied the claims, but her publisher Changbi issued a letter of apology under the name of its head, admitting to the plagiarism in her short story collection, "Legend."The veteran author, who went out of the public eye following the incident, issued a written statement on the accusation in 2019 as she released the novella with the Korean title translated as "The river doesn't know what is carried in the boat."

    This photo, provided by Changbi on March 3, 2021, shows novelist Shin Kyung-sook taking part in an online press conference for her new book. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)hide captionDenying claims that she intentionally copied the passages, she said she felt like "standing in front of a cliff and that her heart was torn" when she thought about her readers."I thought everyday how I could convey my heart," the novelist said. "I felt I write because I can't express all my heart's words. I will make up for the disappointment readers felt by continuing to write."Looking back over the past six years, Shin said it was a time that became a "stepping stone" for her to move on."I was alone but I was most deeply embedded in literature and I diligently found and read new pieces by new authors to not let go of writing," she said. "Those times have become a stepping stone for me to move on."Speaking on her new novel, the novelist defined it as her "tribute to all nameless fathers in this world."Shin's new novel, her eighth novel and first published novel in 11 years, centers around a father whose life goes through the ups and downs of the country's modern history. After losing his parents at the age of 14 due to an infectious disease, hefights in the war as a teenager and faces democracy movements after moving to Seoul.At the same time, the man who lived a rough life is also a father who beams and looks back at life with gratitude when he sees pictures of his children wearing graduation caps.Saying that her new novel includes everything she wanted to say, Shin stressed that writing is something that will continue to drive her life."Literature is like an alibi of my life; it's not something that I can (choose) to do or not do," she said, adding that she wants to be remembered as a person who writes.The writer, who had planned to write about a person who becomes blind one day, said writing the novel prompted her to want to instead write about a laborer and the issue of death.

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  • Korean book exhibit to open Thursday at National Central Library

    ​​Taipei, Feb. 17 (CNA) Taiwan's National Central Library (NCL) will hold a month-long exhibit of Korean books in translation beginning on Thursday, it announced Wednesday.In a press release, the library said the exhibit was originally scheduled to be a part of the 2021 Taipei International Book Exhibition (TIBE), which was moved to an entirely virtual format due to COVID-19 concerns.According to the library, the exhibit will feature a selection of 100 fiction and non-fiction titles, 54 picture books and 15 children's books, and will focus on the themes of gender, the environment and generational change.The Korean Publishers Association, which helped arrange the event, said it will also donate copies of all 169 books to the NCL for the benefit of Taiwan's reading public.Aside from individual readers, the exhibit will also be of interest to domestic libraries and publishers looking to expand their offerings of Korean literature, said NCL director-general Tseng Shu-hsien (曾淑賢).

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  • Feminismus aus Südkorea

    ​​Eigentlich erzählt Roman- und Drehbuchautorin Cho Nam-Joo die Lebensgeschichte einer vollkommen durchschnittlichen Südkoreanerin. Kim Jiyoung ist 1982 in Seoul geboren. Mit einer älteren Schwester und einem jüngeren Bruder wuchs sie auf. Doch ist ihre Biografie seit frühester Kindheit von sexistischer Diskriminierung geprägt. Wie selbstverständlich bekommen ihr Vater und Bruder das größte Stück Fleisch, in der Mittelschule gelten für Mädchen strengere Kleiderordnungen als für Jungen. Kim Jiyoung wird von Lehrern und Arbeitgebern sexuell belästigt, von Kollegen heimlich auf der Toilette gefilmt. Sie wird bei Bewerbungen und Beförderungen benachteiligt, muss schließlich mit der Geburt einer eigenen Tochter ihren Job kündigen und entwickelt im Alter von 33 Jahren eine Psychose.

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  • 韩国平民文学浪潮的继承者金爱烂

    ​这是韩国电影《蜂鸟》的一句话。在重读作家金爱烂的小说时,我又想起了这句台词。之所以把它们联系起来,是因为无论是《蜂鸟》还是金爱烂的小说,它们有着相似的亲切感,这种亲切感怎么说呢,你知道它们是很严肃的文本,但不遥远,它们不像很多严肃的内容冷冰冰的、给人高不可攀的感觉,它们的主人公就是最普通的一批人,笔触也是饱含恻隐之心的,在阅读金爱烂的小说时,我一直在思考这种亲切感如何而来,直到想起《蜂鸟》,我想自己有了答案。

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  • O 'Robin Wood coreano'

    ​​Inspirada em uma figura histórica, Hong Gildong é conhecido como um dos Três Grandes Bandidos de Joseon, que os coreanos usam hoje como um nome genérico, correspondente a algo como “João da Silva” em português, em sinal de sua onipresença no imaginário coletivo coreano. Escrita em 1612 durante a dinastia Joseon, A história de Hong Gildong (Estação Liberdade, 144 pp, R$ 39 – Trad.: Yun Jung Im) conta a trajetória de seu protagonista desde o nascimento, na pele de filho ilegítimo de um nobre e sua concubina. Em uma sucessão de aventuras e façanhas, destacam-se sua inteligência excepcional e dons supernaturais. Com o “destino forjado pelo céu”, Gildong é capaz de prodígios como o domínio das artes mágicas, a capacidade de encurtar distâncias e desdobrar-se e criar réplicas de si mesmo, enquanto que sua força sobre-humana e astúcia são as armas que mobiliza para enfrentar seus antagonistas, sejam eles os poderosos ou os espíritos malignos. Hong Gildong é considerado o “Robin Hood coreano”, já que ele é também um “herói bandido” – que tira dos ricos para dar aos pobres. O livro é tido como a primeira obra ficcional composta em hangeul – escrita de cunho alfabético (letras que representam sons) pelas mãos de Heo Gyun (1569-1618), um nobre letrado que deixou uma obra que engloba filosofia, poesia, ensaios e ficção, todos redigidos em ideogramas chineses, com exceção desta.

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  • Woher hat Fiffi das Menschenbein?

    ​​Das Gedächtnis zu verlieren ist schlimm genug. Um so ernsthafter ist das Problem für einen Serienmörder. Dabei hat sich der 70jährige Byong Su Kim, aus dessen »Aufzeichnungen« der Roman des Autors Young Ha Kim besteht, eigentlich zur Ruhe gesetzt. Im Alter von 16 hatte er seinen gewalttätigen Vater mit dem Kopfkissen erstickt, mit 45 verlor er die Lust am Töten. Ab und zu besucht er das Lyriktreffen an der lokalen Volkshochschule; die Gedichte, in denen er seine Morde schildert, werden vom ahnungslosen Kursleiter wegen ihrer schönen Metaphern gelobt. Dann wieder sitzt er verwirrt auf der Polizeiwache. Dort kennt man ihn schon und weiß, in welche Wohnung man ihn bringen muss. Die Diagnose lautet auf Alzheimer.Und ausgerechnet nun treibt in der Gegend ein Serienmörder sein Unwesen. Beunruhigt blättert Kim seinen Kalender durch, stellt aber fest, dass er für die Tatzeit ein Alibi hat. Das aber heißt, dass es einen anderen Mörder gibt, dass Kims Tochter Un Hi gefährdet ist! Was soll er unternehmen? Er weiß, wie vergesslich er nun ist und dass er alles, was er bemerkt, aufschreiben muss. Kurz darauf liest er, dass in der Nähe ein Serienmörder zugeschlagen hat. Als er in seinem Tagebuch blättert, findet er die bereits wieder vergessenen Aufzeichnungen über die drohende Gefahr.Hintergrund ist die südkoreanische Gewaltgeschichte der Nachkriegszeit. Die Karriere des Serienmörders Kim entspricht – vom Erscheinungsjahr des koreanischen Originals 2013 an zurückgerechnet – ungefähr den Militärdiktaturen der Generale Park und Chun. Kim blieb nicht nur unentdeckt, weil die Ermittlungstechniken auf einem kläglichen Stand waren, sondern weil die Polizei Verdächtige folterte und diese Morde gestanden, die sie gar nicht begangen hatten. Die Gegenwartshandlung ist dann ein gespenstisches Ausblenden der Vergangenheit.

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  • "Pachinko", le roman dont vous n'avez pas fini d'entendre parler

    ​Vendu à plusieurs millions d'exemplaires, le livre de Min Jin Lee paraît ce mardi en français en librairie, en parallèle d'une adaptation sur le petit écran en cours de production chez Apple.

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  • 2021「台北國際書展」樂讀好時光 與韓國文學翻譯院(KLTI)以「XYZ時代」為主題 展示世代更迭、性別、第三性、人類末日等想像力意涵

    ​​2021年台北國際書展將於1月26日至31日在世貿一館1、2樓H區盛大展開,主題為「樂讀好時光」、主題國為「韓國」。在現今疫情影響下,有賴臺灣全民防疫,2021台北國際書展將會是2021年首場實體書展,文化部期盼大家遵守防疫措施,一同參觀書展。經歷近2年的醞釀,2021台北國際書展精采程度更勝以往,世貿一館1樓「韓國主題國館」,由韓國出版協會(KPA)與韓國文學翻譯院(KLTI)共同規劃,展館將以「XYZ時代」為主題,實虛併進展示世代更迭、性別、第三性、人類末日等各種豐富且充滿想像力的意涵;「2020義大利波隆那插畫展精選」亦跨海盛情展出,特別由義大利波隆那兒童書展主辦單位授權,首度在台北國際書展呈現2020年入選之國際插畫家畫作。國立臺灣文學館策劃的「臺文館-語我同行」,因應國家語言發展法,將以導覽機器人打頭陣,以華、臺、客、英語及手語,提供多語導覽服務;「文策院展區」則展示自去年成立以來推廣外譯、版權及出版IP成果,彰顯臺灣版權推廣好成績。兒童館首度移入一館,全新結合多媒體互動及美術視覺,規劃兒童互動體驗區,另有「中小學生讀物選介主題館」推廣各類適合中小學生閱讀的好書;「樂讀臺灣主題館」將展示臺灣精彩地方誌,安排全臺傳統藝師進行手工藝展演、職人手做、繪本故事及創生對談,呈現臺灣草根精神與活耀的生命力。此外,文學書區、公民書區等主題展區依然讓人超期待。二樓的「古事‧博物館」為文化部7個館所聯展,從「讀藝術」、「讀歷史」、「讀人權」為主題呈現博物館多元觀點,藉由閱讀引發讀者對博物館的興趣而親近博物館;「數位主題館」展現閱讀與科技跨域結合的成果。「書展市集」包含「職人書架」及「故事野餐」兩大主題,在這場年度閱讀盛宴裡加入文創、手作的質感及樂趣,增添生活裡不同層次的美味。向來廣受好評的台北國際書展專業論壇,包含七度與法蘭克福書展合作「法蘭克福出版人才培訓課程」,聚焦行銷與授權專題;以「後疫情時代亞洲出版新面貌—臺灣與韓國」為題的「國際出版論壇」,邀請韓國出版專家視訊座談,剖析亞洲出版業面臨疫情時代的新契機;同樣以「後疫情時代的出版趨勢與經營」為題的「出版力論壇」,則是取經國內資深出版人,提出營運上死裡重生的貼切觀察;「書籍設計論壇」和「童書論壇」,分別以「書籍設計的未來」及「知識類童書的創意與美感」為題,邀請專家、藝術家等座談,為創作者與從業人員注入國際視野提升知識鍛鍊。為刺激圖書消費,文化部首次推出「TiBE購書抵用劵」,每張面額100元,共計20萬張,限量發送,購票入場及免票入場者均可領取,適用於所有購票(現場、預售、交通卡入場)民眾。凡18歲以下、報名「寒假趣書展」團體、外籍人士、身障人士、持展期當日高鐵或臺鐵桃園以南(含)或宜花東票根者皆可免費入場。符合免費入場資格,可預先上網填寫兌換表單取得QRCode以換取抵用券,歡迎大家一起參與2021台北國際書展,做好防疫,買好書、過好年。文化部再次呼籲參展民眾應全程配戴口罩,並下載MyCode實名制進場,配合量測體溫。若民眾於居家檢疫、居家隔離、自主健康管理期間者,或有發燒、呼吸道症狀、腹瀉、嗅味覺異常者,請在家休息,並可透過線上書展網站、影音平臺、社群媒體欣賞線上書展主題展、閱讀推廣影片,勿至現場參觀,以共同營造安心安全的觀展環境。(NFG-流行電通-NeoFashionGo-www.neofashiongo.com) (EDN-東方數位新聞-EastDigitalNews-www.eastdigitalnews.com)本文出處『新聞來源/Wow!NEWS新聞網』

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  • 共感持てる 韓国文学人気 広島・エディオン蔦屋、コーナー1年半続く /広島

    ​韓流ドラマやK―POPに続き「Kブック」とも呼ばれる韓国文学が、全国の書店でフェアが開かれるなど注目されている。広島市の書店でも、韓国人と在日コリアンの作品を集めたコーナーが好評。当初は1カ月限定の企画だったが、反響が大きいため1年半続いている。品ぞろえも増やし、現在90タイトル以上が並ぶ。 JR広島駅前の「エディオン蔦屋家電」(南区)は2019年夏にコーナーを設置した。女性への理不尽な扱いを描いた小説「82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン」が日本でもヒットし、韓国文学への注目度が上がったためだ。 「ドキリとする刺激の強い表現が魅力」と話すのは、担当店員の吉田泰則さん(42)だ。「日本文学でここまでフェミニズムや社会問題を前面に出すものは少ない。小説もエッセーも新鮮で、日本文化と近く、親しみやすい」と語る。お薦めは、頑張っても不幸になるのはなぜかを問い掛けるエッセー「あやうく一生懸命生きるところだった」。現代人の悩みは日韓共通だと分かり、共感を持てたという。

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  • 2021 Taipei International Book Exhibition to feature South Korean literature

    The 2021 Taipei International Book Exhibition (TIBE) has already launched online and is scheduled to kick off its in-person event on January 26 at the Taipei World Trade Center.The event organizer, Taipei Book Fair Foundation, and the Ministry of Culture (MOC), which sponsored the exhibition, announced the highlights of the 29th fair on Tuesday (Dec. 29). According to the MOC, the upcoming event features South Korea as its guest of honor, and an exhibition themed "XYZ" will showcase hundreds of South Korean classic works and hold online talks with authors and literary critics from the East Asian country.Due to the pandemic, an online version of the book fair was launched on Tuesday, said the ministry. The physical book fair will last from Jan. 26-31.The main exhibition, a children's play zone, and a reading area for elementary and junior high school students will all be on the first floor, while a digital area will be located on the second floor. On Jan. 29, curator Lee Ming-tsung (李明璁) will invite book lovers to read together and there will be DJs and artists on site.In addition to the fair, the MOC will distribute 200,000 book coupons each worth NT$100 (USD$3.50). Only those who are under 18 years old and join the "Winter vacation goes to the book fair" program, foreigners, people with disabilities, and High-Speed Railway or train ticket holders are eligible to apply for the coupons.

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.63

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.62

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  • 韓国文学の重鎮パク・ワンソに見る 女性たちの体験した朝鮮戦争/斎藤真理子の韓国現代文学入門【4】

    朝鮮戦争については2回に分けて書くつもりでしたが、結局4回になってしまいました。やはりこのテーマには書くことがたくさんあります。

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  • Beurel Axelle / cdi@lfseoul.org

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  • Triển lãm sách và gặp gỡ tác giả Hàn Quốc tại Hà Nội

    Ngày 6/11 tác giả Cho Chang In của tác phẩm 'Bố con cá gai' được nhiều bạn đọc Việt Nam biết đến sẽ có cuộc trò chuyện trực tuyến với độc giả Việt Nam.

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  • THE BEST KOREAN FICTION IN TRANSLATION

    The rise of Korean literature in translation has been one of the most exciting developments to watch in the literary world in recent years. Winning both critical acclaim and popular success, books like Please Look After Mom and the widely discussed The Vegetarian set the scene for a rush of new books in translation from South Korea.

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  • 韓国のベストセラー作家による注目の新刊! 現代社会の不条理と闘う女性たちの「強さ」に励まされる短編小説集『彼女の名前は』

    韓国で社会現象を巻き起こし、130万部のヒットとなったベストセラー小説『82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン』(訳:斎藤真理子、筑摩書房刊)で知られるチョ・ナムジュによる短編集。60人余りの“普通の女性”へのインタビューを元に書かれた、日々の暮らしのなかで遭う不条理に声を上げる女性たちの28編の物語。

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  • 「K-BOOKフェスティバル 2020 in Japan」第2回を 11月28日・29日に開催決定! ~作り手と読者をオンラインでつなぐK-BOOKの祭典~

    韓国の文学、エッセイから絵本、人文書までここ数年次々と刊行され、日本国内でも40万部超を売り上げる作品も登場するなど、“K-BOOK”人気が高まっています。K-BOOKフェスティバルは、いま話題の“K-BOOK”をこよなく愛する人たちの「もっと読みたい、もっと知りたい」という声にお応えする本のお祭りです。

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  • 映画『82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン』に心揺さぶられた人へ。原作翻訳者が伝えたい女性たちの物語10選

    現在公開中の韓国映画『82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン』。同名の原作小説は日本で大ベストセラーとなり、読んだ人も少なくないだろう。

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  • 日本で「キム・ジヨン」が共感呼びヒット、K文学にも注目集まる

    2020年10月19日、韓国・世界日報は、小説が原作の韓国映画「82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン」が日本でも共感を呼んでいるとし、「K文学がK-POPに負けない注目を集めている」と伝えた。

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  • 韓国文学の魅力知って 来月オンラインフェス ブッカー賞作家ら登場

    韓国文学を幅広く紹介する「K−BOOKフェスティバル2020 in Japan」(一般社団法人K−BOOK振興会、韓国国際交流財団共催、韓昌祐・哲文化財団など後援)が、11月28、29の両日開かれる。昨年スタートした。3密を避けるため、2回目の今年はオンラインのみで開催される。(五味洋治)

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  • 映画、ドラマの次は“韓国文学”にチャレンジしてみない?♡今読みたいとっておきの作品を5冊集めました

    国内外問わず大ヒットを記録している韓国文学『82年生まれ、キム・ジヨン』の実写映画が、日本でもついに公開されましたね。

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  • These 8 Horror Novels by Diverse Authors Add a New Dimension To the Genre

    One of my favorite things about the horror genre is the imaginative ways it can be interpreted. We’re seeing now more than ever authors of diverse backgrounds tackling the genre and subverting it in ways that breathe fresh life into classic tropes, and create groundbreaking new favorites.

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  • قراءة في رواية: الدجاجة التي حلمت بالطيران

    الرواية رمزية وتجسد فكرة مهمة أن كل أنثى بداخلها تلك الأم المضحية والحنونة والمحبة التي تخاف على طفلها

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  • Ly kỳ và bất ngờ về sách “Nàng Heo Annie Gầy Còm” và “Kẻ Cắp Sách”

    Hai cuốn sách mới nhất được mua bản quyền từ Hàn Quốc là “Nàng Heo Annie Gầy Còm” và “Kẻ Cắp Sách” vừa được ra mắt với đầy yếu tố bất ngờ về mặt tối trong tâm lý con người.

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  • Văn học Hàn Quốc đến gần hơn với độc giả Việt Nam

    Tại buổi giao lưu, thông qua tác phẩm “Nàng heo Annie gầy còm” của nhà văn Chanyang Cho và “Kẻ cắp sách” tác giả You Sun Dong, độc giả được lắng nghe chia sẻ về những điều thú vị, những triết lý sâu sắc; đồng thời hiểu thêm về phong cách văn học của Hàn Quốc.

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  • Tabatha Leggett / tabathaleggett@gmail.com

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  • NamJinJu / jinju.nam@mcst-csc.go.kr

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  • NamJinJu / jinju.nam@mcst-csc.go.kr

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.61

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  • 문화체육관광 사이버안전센터 / soyeon.won@mcst-csc.go.kr

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  • Verso snares Hwang Sok-Yong's imprisonment memoir

    Verso Books is to publish the memoir of Korean novelist Hwang Sok-Yong, which details the years he spent in a Seoul Detention Centre. 

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  • 10 EERIE BOOKS FOR AUTUMN

    The Hole is a masterpiece of Korean Literature. After a car accident leaves him a widower and paralyzed, Ogi wakes from a coma to discover that his elderly mother-in-law is caring for him.​

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  • Washington state writers on National Book Award longlists share insights into their creativity

    ​Choi is the author and translator of several books, chapbooks and essays across genres. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Choi works as an advisory editor for Action Books’ Korean Literature Series, translates for International Women’s Network Against Militarism, and teaches adult basic education at Renton Technical College’s community partnership site in downtown Seattle.

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  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Shruti Parthasarathy / shruti.psarathy@gmail.com

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  • Reading Yeong-Shin Ma’s ‘Moms’ to understand why the Korean Wave has swept through parts of India

    Similar motivations underlie yet another superb South Korean cultural export, Yeoung-Shin Ma’s graphic novel Moms (Drawn & Quarterly), which was recently released in a deft, impactful English translation by Janet Hong. It illuminates subjects twice overlooked: the urban precariat that every country tends to ignore, and more specifically the interior lives of middle-aged working women trying to navigate the margins of late capitalism.

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  • Monica Kim / itsmonicakim@me.com

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > Q&A

  • Monica Kim / itsmonicakim@me.com

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  • First South Korean 'comfort women' novel released in English

    An English translation of Kim Soom’s 2016 novel “Han Myong” (one person), the first South Korean novel centered on so-called “comfort women” — those who suffered under Japan’s military brothel system before and during World War II — has been released this month as the issue continues to cast a shadow on bilateral relations.

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  • Q&A with Frances Cha ’07, author of ‘If I Had Your Face’

    Frances Cha ’07’s debut novel “If I Had Your Face” has been making waves in the literary world. The Guardian praised the novel — a story about four young women navigating the rigid cultural hierarchies, impossible beauty standards and plastic surgery craze of contemporary Korean culture — as a “fizzing, grisly debut.” The Washington Post even likened the book to Bong Joon-Ho’s Academy Award-winning “Parasite.” 

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.60

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  • SOUTH KOREA: THE ACCIDENTAL TRANSLATOR

    ANDREA PLATE WRITES — Lizzie Buehler, 25, raised in Texas, is the translator of The Disaster Tourist, South Korean author Yun Ko-eun’s first novel to be translated into English and published in the US recently.​

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  • Crimes that history cannot absolve

    ​Korean literature has been enjoying a literary renaissance for quite some time through translation, from the likes of Hang Kang's beguiling yet gruesome novel, The Vegetarian (2007) to Yeonmi Park's heart wrenching memoir, In Order to Live (2015).

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  • Florencia Correa / fcorreaa@uft.edu

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  • Florencia Correa / fcorreaa@uft.edu

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  • Florencia Correa / fcorreaa@uft.edu

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  • Florencia Correa / fcorreaa@uft.edu

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  • Florencia Correa / fcorreaa@uft.edu

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  • Eerie Detachment and The Domestic Surreal: A Review of Ha Seong-Nan’s Bluebeard’s First Wife

    “Bluebeard’s First Wife,” originally published in 2002, is a collection of short stories from South Korean author Ha Seong-Nan.

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  • Temporary Closed for preventing the spread of COVID-19 (8. 20. ~ 9. 4.)

    Date: 8. 20. [Thr] ~ 9. 4.[Fri] Due to the important release of the government for COIVD-19, LTI Korea Library will be closed to the public until 20 August. For users who have borrowed library materials in your possession, we are extending loan periods during 20 August to 4 September, so you do not need to return materials until we are back in full operation. Additionally, our digital resources are always available to read for members of the digital library. Sorry for the inconvenience this may cause. Your understanding would be greatly appreciated. Contact: library@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7755(3)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.59

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  • The Expectations That Travelers Carried: The Disaster Tourist by Yun Ko-eun (trans. Lizzie Buehler)

    The Disaster Tourist is a trim near-future speculative novel from Yun Ko-eun, the first of her novels to be translated and published in English.

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  • Rocio de Isasa / rocio.isasa@harpercollinsiberica.com

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  • KOREAN FEMINISTS IN TRANSLATION: GENIUS DISASTER TOURIST GUIDE

    ​ANDREA PLATE WRITES – Who could possibly find humor in severed heads, natural disasters and mass graves? South Korean author Yun Ko Eun does, as will any reader of the English language version of her novel, The Disaster Tourist (Counterpoint), published just this month in the US.

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  • Ian Mond Reviews Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 by Cho Nam-Joo

    Since its publication in 2016, Cho Nam-Joo’s Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 has sold over a million copies in South Korea, been touted as one of the country’s most important feminist novels, and sparked vicious attacks from anti-feminists, which were reignited when the book was adapted into a film in 2019.

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  • ‘Chiếc thang cao màu xanh’ - hoài niệm tuổi trẻ buồn bã và mất mát

    Thời gian có thật hàn gắn vết thương hay nó chỉ càng làm thêm nhức nhối ở nơi sâu thẳm của tâm hồn?

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.58

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  • SOUTH KOREA: THE LAW OF LINES – THEY’RE MADE TO BE CROSSED

    The Law of Lines (Arcade Publishing), by Pyun Hye-yung, may be the most fiercely feminist novel of the South Korean #MeToo literary wave to make a splash in America this year.

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  • Eine verhängnisvolle Reise

    Am ehesten erinnert uns ihr Schreiben an die Bestsellerautorin Han Kang (Die Vegtarierin). Statt einer Reise gelähmt und allein. Halb verzweifelt fühlt sich Ogi

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  • Anthony Hegarty / dsrm.kor@gmail.com

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  • Mord der Erzählung

    In der Tat ist, was Kim Young-Ha zu erzählen hat, smart und vielschichtig, was man nach dem Anriss der Handlung noch gar nicht glauben will: Der ehemalige

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  • #MulherBacanaLê: "A Vegetariana", de Han Kang

    Escrito por Han Kang, com tradução de Jae Hyung Woo, o pequeno e intenso título é, por certo, uma das leituras mais mexeu comigo e marcou a minha vida.

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  • Dear Kutu Buku, 4 Buku Best Seller Korea Ini Diterjemahkan ...

    Buku ini ditulis oleh Haemin Sunim, seorang guru meditasi asal Korea Selatan yang juga menempuh pendidikannya di Amerika. Isinya lebih banyak membahas

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  • 5 Buku Best Seller Korea Ini Diterjemahkan ke Indonesia ...

    Buku dengan sampul yang didominasi warna hijau dari rerumputan ini adalah buku yang ditulis oleh Haemin Sunim, seorang guru meditasi asal Korea Selatan

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.57

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  • A Nabokov obscure vocabulary quiz, an interview with Hang Kang’s translator, and more

    The Quietus interviews Deborah Smith on her work translating Korean author Han Kang and her progress on launching a new publishing house.This infographic displays interesting moments from the history of the NSK Neustadt Prize featuring Mildred D. Taylor, Katherine Paterson, and more.For International Women’s Day, PEN America launched its March feature that will focus on the cases of courageous women writers. In this interview, recent WLT contributor Porochista Khakpour shares about her critically lauded novels and her forthcoming memoir about Lyme disease. The schedule for the 2016 Puterbaugh Festival has been announced! The literary festival featuring Alain Mabanckou will be April 6–8. The Native Crossroads Film Festival is occurring the same week as the Puterbaugh literary festival this year! Take advantage of this opportunity to attend a combination of film and literary events on the OU campus in Norman, Oklahoma.Vogue featured Valeria Luiselli and her husband Álvaro Enrigue in this article about their “buzzy” new novels and life in New York City.A short-story collection smuggled out of North Korea will be published in English in 2017.J.K. Rowling released part one of her new Magic in North America series. How familiar are you with Vladimir Nabokov’s unfamiliar vocabulary? This Nabokov quiz by Merriam-Webster digs through his lexis of obscure words. This “tales of dependency” reading list by Literary Hub features books where the characters’ lives are in someone else’s hands.Looking for a literary way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day? Barnes and Noble lists seven contemporary Irish authors to read.Flavorwire showcases 10 stunning bookshelf designs where the shelves cover entire walls.

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  • Han Kang wins the Man Booker International Prize, the most commonly used words by poets, and more

    South Korean writer Han Kang—featured on the cover of the current issue of WLT—has won the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for her novel The Vegetarian. She received the award with her translator Deborah Smith. Women sci-fi writers swept this year’s Nebula Awards, including recent WLT contributor Nnedi Okorafor who won for her novella Binti. The Pushcart Prize 2016 edition features “The Age of Skin” by 2016 Neustadt Prize laureate Dubravka Ugrešić, and also “Wanderlust” by recent Neustadt Prize juror Laleh Khadivi. At the PEN Gala this week, JK Rowling received the PEN/Allen Foundation Literary Service Awards and spoke about the importance of freedom of speech. Egyptian novelist and journalist Ahmed Naji—who is currently serving a two-year prison term in Egypt—was recognized with the PEN/Barbey Freedom to Write Award. Via the American Scholar, novelist Susan Baker acknowledges the 50th anniversary of the start of China’s Cultural Revolution with these 10 tales from China. In this interview on the Between the Covers podcast, Idra Novey talks about why she made a translator the hero-protagonist of her novel, translating Clarice Lispector, and more. In this Fresh Air interview, Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses his novel The Sympathizer and his escape from Vietnam. A group of female crime novelists are organizing their own literary festival in London called Killer Women. Writer Mark Haddon shares in the Atlantic why art should be uncomfortable. National Readathon Day is this Saturday! Host or a find a party, or join in the conversation using the hashtag #Readathon2016. What are the most commonly used words by poets like Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, or Edgar Allan Poe? Check out these interactive word clouds that display the results of over 35,000 analyzed poems.   Envelope yourself in your literary happy place with these perfumes that smell just like old books, or one of these 66 candles that smell like books.

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  • Korean literature in translation, the best picture books of 2015, and more

    The Huffington Post lists the best picture books of 2015 and gives a nostalgic tribute to NSK Neustadt Prize laureate Vera B. Williams.Robert J. Fouser takes a hopeful look at the state of Korean literature in translation. WLT contributor and Puterbaugh fellow Hélène Cardona has been awarded a Hemingway Grant for her translation of Plus loin qu'ailleurs by Gabriel Arnou-Laujeac. The translation, Beyond Elsewhere, is forthcoming from White Pine Press in 2016. WLT student interns Cara Alizadeh and Tyler Christian are starting a new publication at the University of Oklahoma called The NORM. Three Percent provides updates to its translation database, and AmazonCrossing published an impressive 75 translations in 2015.Flavorwire discusses Svetlana Alexievich’s Nobel Prize lecture and how it illuminates the year in literature. NPR’s Book Concierge provides a guide to 260 titles that NPR staff and critics loved this year.End-of-year booklists come in all shapes and sizes. This one lists the 10 best books by academic publishers in 2015. Brain Pickings rounds up the best art books of 2015.

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  • Писатель из Южной Кореи номинирован на премию Айснера

    Об этом сообщает KBS со ссылкой на представителей Корейского института литературных переводов (LTI Korea). По их словам, автор и работа

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  • Mads / themads@me.com

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  • Bluebeard's First Wife by Ha Seong-nan, review: pertinent ...

    Bluebeard's First Wife by Ha Seong-nan, review: pertinent short story collection from celebrated Korean author. Published 18 years ago but now translated into

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  • BOOK REVIEW: A SOUTH KOREAN AUTHOR TELLS A ...

    So says Kim Sagwa, author of four acclaimed novels and two short story collections, who knows something about adolescent angst. This pre-eminent South

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  • A literatura e o outro

    Nele, Park Min-gyu fala de algumas cenas e seres que o levam a escrever, coisas vistas no dia a dia ou mesmo em imagens da mídia. Se tiver que resumir

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  • Biram knjigu: 'Molim te, pazi na mamu'

    Kyung-sook Shin (1963, Jeongeup, Južna Koreja) cijenjena je i nagrađivana autorica, kako u vlastitoj zemlji tako i izvan nje. Njezin književni prvijenac 'Winter

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  • Best-selling authors, veteran actors jump to filmmaking

    An adaptation of novelist Kim Un-su's 2016 novel of the same name, "The Boiling Blood" revolves around a gang member who tries to cut ties with gang life and

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  • Novelist Hwang Sok-yong explores topic of industrial labor in ...

    SEOUL, June 2 (Yonhap) -- Hwang Sok-yong, considered one of South Korea's most important and influential modern day novelists, said Tuesday that he

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  • Review: Another deep dive into dark minds from a masterful ...

    ... in Kim's translation of Kyung-sook Shin's Man Asian Literary Prize winner, “Please Look After Mom.” “Seven Years of Darkness” is an admirable achievement,

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  • SOUTH KOREA: IS WORLD-FAMOUS AUTHOR BAE SUAH ...

    Like her other groundbreaking novels, Untold Night and Day is akin to neither old-school, mainstream Korean literature (with its themes of patriarchy, family,

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  • Az élőknek sem könnyű

    Han Kang már az első magyarul is megjelent regényével, a 2016-ban Nemzetközi Man Booker-díjat nyert A növényevővel is bizonyította, milyen finoman képes

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  • A new generation of female Korean novelists are dismantling ...

    The popularity of Han Kang's award-winning The Vegetarian, a chilling critique of gendered expectations, is often pointed to as when this boom began.

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  • Je třeba cítit bolest druhých, říká korejská spisovatelka Han ...

    Han Kang (1970) je jednou z nejznámějších jihokorejských autorek. Česky jí zatím vyšly tři knihy: Vegetariánka (2017), Kde kvete tráva (2018) a Bílá kniha

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  • The Korean novel that champions the value of ordinary women

    Han Kang's The Vegetarian, about a frustrated housewife who starves herself and believes she is turning into a tree, became a global bestseller and won the

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  • 'Het is een erg fijn boek boordevol wijze lessen'

    Zij tipt 'Het huis met de kersenbloesem' van Sun-mi Hwang. “Ik vind het een prachtige roman van deze Zuid-Koreaanse schrijfster, die vanwege armoede niet

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  • Fabulous characters entertain pandemic-weary readers

    Shin, a professor of Korean literature at Konkuk University in Seoul, said he hopes the characters he revisited in his book can inspire readers stressed out amid

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  • May 2020 Reads for the Rest of Us

    This is a fantastic next read from another masterful Korean writer. Following 28-year-old Ayami throughout one summer day and night in Seoul, this serpentine

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  • 5 cuốn sách về mẹ phải đọc một lần trong đời

    Hãy chăm só‌c mẹ - Kyung-sook Shin: Tác phẩm nổi tiếng của nhà văn giành gi‌ải Văn học châu Á năm 2011 là tấm gương để chúng ta đối diện lòng mình và tự

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.56

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  • 20 Must-Read Small Press Short Story Collections and ...

    Something menaces in every story from this Korean author. Category ID: 476. Check Your Shelf Newsletter. Sign up to receive Check Your Shelf, the Librarian's

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  • New Book Releases: May 5, 2020

    UNTOLD NIGHT AND DAY, Bae Suah, Deborah Smith (Translator). A young woman and her boss walk all over Seoul looking for their missing elderly friend.

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  • Billy Porter On Being Cinderella's Fairy Godmother: Critical ...

    Han Kang's International Booker prizewinner The Vegetarian, like Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982,follows a seemingly unremarkable woman, who withdraws from

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  • Around the world in 8 books

    The Vegetarian by Han Kang (originally in Korean). Set in modern-day Seoul, this book tells the story of Yeong-hye, a married woman who decides to stop

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  • Words As Resistance: Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 by Cho Nam-Joo

    Now there is Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982, a multi-million copy international bestseller by South Korean author, Cho Nam-Joo. An overnight sensation in South Korea

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  • 5 indicações de livros para você presentear no Dia das Mães

    "As coisas que você só vê quando desacelera", do mestre zen-budista sul-coreano Haemin Sunim, é um maneira original de iluminar importantes temas

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  • Assar Schmidt / assar.schmidt@gmail.com

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  • Inspiración lectora para un Día del Libro atípico

    La autora, Han Kang, cuenta la historia de Yeonghye, una mujer que decide dejar de comer carne y cómo esta decisión tendrá consecuencias en su vida

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  • 'A coldness that masks a burning rage': South Korea's female ...

    Beauty and brutality have long been entangled in South Korean literature. But while violence was previously explored in literature through the masculine world

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  • Fever dream: Pip Adam on Bae Suah and the art of translation

    Sora Kim-Russell has been my gateway to Korean literature for a few years now. Basically, if she's translated it, I'll read it. I'm in no position to judge the

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  • Το σώμα της έγινε η κραυγή της

    Το λέει η 50χρονη σήμερα Χαν Γκανγκ (Han Kang), η σπουδαιότερη συγγραφέας της γενιάς της στη Νότια Κορέα, και εννοεί κάτι πολύ ευρύτερο και πολύ

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  • Evde ne okunur? 21.04.2020

    Han Kang bizleri şiddeti, ilişkilerimizi ve saplantılarımızı sorgulayacağımız rahatsız edici bir yolculuğa çıkarıyor. "Kang, insan beyninin ve bedeninin

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  • [Herald Interview] US literary agency founder says US, UK ...

    The first work of Korean literature to be translated into English was “The Cloud Dream of the Nine” in 1922, translated by Canadian missionary James S. Gale.

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  • Hep Aynı Listeleri Görmekten İflahı Kesilenlerin Karantina ...

    Han Kang, ölülerle, geride bıraktıkları yaşayan ölüler arasındaki ince çizgiden yazıyor. Alacakaranlık kuşağına korkusuzca dalıyor, adalet ve demokrasi tarihinin

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  • Korean coming-of-age novel wins Japanese literary award

    Award-winning author Kim Young-ha's best-seller "A Murderer's Guide to Memorization" was translated into German and topped the best thriller and suspense

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  • The Heroine of This Korean Best Seller Is Extremely Ordinary ...

    “There is no Korean literature without women or feminism right now,” said So J. Lee, who has translated contemporary Korean poetry and fiction by women.

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  • [Interview] A passion for informing the world about Korea

    ... and Korea -- translated by Brother Anthony of Taize, a British-born translator of Korean literature who has become a naturalized South Korean citizen -- as well

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.55

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  • Priyanka Chakraborty / priyankachakraborty937@gmail.com

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  • Baek Heena Wins 2020 Astrid Lindgren Award

    ... together to celebrate a major accolade: South Korean author-illustrator Baek Heena has been named the winner of the 2020 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award,

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  • Korean author wins 2020 Astrid Lindgren Award

    South Korean author and illustrator Baek Heena has won the 2020 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, the world's largest children's book award. "With exquisite

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  • Book Club: Han Kang's The Vegetarian and The White Book

    Book Club: Han Kang's The Vegetarian and The White Book. Living in translation: from South Korea to the rest of the world. By Sana Mohsin. on March 29, 2020.

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  • Knižní výběr Salonu: Vrba, Han Kang, Šimáček a Beran

    V dnešním knižním výběru Salonu najdete povídky Michala Vrby, nominované na Magnesii Literu za prózu, knihu jihokorejské spisovatelky Han Kang

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  • Stellar March Books Out in the UK

    As a fan of Korean literature, this epic has been on my radar for a while. Three friends are caught between the warring states of North and South Korea in this

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  • Four notable Korean authors to be published in foreign ...

    According to the Literature Translation Institute of Korea, a state-run institute that promotes Korean literature abroad, at least 91 Korean books are being

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  • The 35 Best Books You've Now Got Time To Read

    Human Acts by Han Kang. In Human Acts, the victims and survivors of the 1980 Gwangju uprising in South Korea have their stories told. The narrative fragments

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  • Miłość do rzeczy niedoskonałych

    Haemin Sunim podpowiada, jak w każdej chwili, w każdym spotkaniu czy w codziennych obowiązkach dążyć do wewnętrznego spokoju. Do oddzielenia tego, co

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  • Korean author publishes memoir on growing up in Queens ...

    Korean author publishes memoir on growing up in Queens before the digital age. Photo courtesy of Yongsoo Park. Writer Yongsoo Park is recounting what life

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.54

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  • Untold Night and Day by Bae Suah review – surrealism in Seoul

    Untold Night and Day by Bae Suah review – surrealism in Seoul. A haunting and dreamlike wander through the intricacies of Korean society by a radical and

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  • Namdžu, Čo Kim Čijong – ročník 82

    Nutno ovšem říci, že cesta Han Kang k uznání byla poměrně dlouhá, protože v rodné zemi nevzbudila Vegetariánka větší pozornost, ta přišla až o deset let

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  • Murder is more cumbersome than you think

    So far, everything is plausible in the "records of a serial killer," the South Korean author Young-ha Kim seems to be. But the old man, remembers as first-person

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  • 30 UK Literary Highlights for the First Half of 2020

    A remarkable novel by a South Korean sensation that has already garnered praise from talents like Han Kang and Sayaka Murata. A cultural sensation in its

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  • Dari Buku Ini, Mahasiswi Psikologi Ini Belajar Banyak Tentang ...

    Haemin Sunim menekankan pentingnya menjalin hubungan yang lebih dalam dengan orang lain dan berbelas kasih serta memaafkan terhadap diri sendiri.

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  • Capturing the gender inequality through Asian writers' eyes

    Cho Nam-joo, a South Korean author who writes the story of “Kim Ji-young, Born in 1982”, captures the moment of inequality girl students face inside the

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  • Existential crises and the search for identity

    Bae Suah, who has published more than a dozen novels and short stories since 1993, is one of South Korea's most inventive experimental writers. She stays true

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  • Exceptional January Books Out in the UK

    Untold Day and Night By Bae Suah (Jonathan Cape). Unfolding over a sultry day and night in Seoul, this is a dreamlike tale of a woman walking the streets of

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  • Indie Press Round-Up: February New Releases and More

    Kim Sagwa writes unsparingly about their isolation and unhappiness, and the world she evokes is mysterious but unwelcoming, with its dangerous ocean,

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  • Göksel Türközü: Dünya genelinde Kore Akımı kavramı var

    Şu anda Kore'nin genç erkek yazarlarından Kim Yeonsu'nun Mucize Çocuk adlı romanını çeviriyorum. Bu yıl içinde Doğan Kitap yayınlayacak. Ayrıca Han Kang'ın

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  • K-literatura: algunos libros para adentrarse en Corea, el país ...

    Tal vez La plaza, de Choi In-Hun una de las novelas clásicas surcoreanas que se estudia en sus centros educativos, nos ayude a entender la mentalidad de

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  • Kiley Reid's debut novel is a brilliant dissection of race and class

    Untold Night and Day by Bae Suah, one of South Korea's most acclaimed contemporary writers, could not be called a page-turner. In fact, the plot is so gentle it

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  • Kim Young-ha's first novel in 7 yrs released exclusively via e ...

    20 (Yonhap) -- Best-selling novelist Kim Young-ha chose Millie's Library, a subscription-based e-book service provider, to release his new work of fiction,

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  • Kim Sagwa's novel takes a scathing look at South Korean ...

    Kim Sagwa's novel takes a scathing look at South Korean conformist society through the eyes of middle school girls. By. Jennifer Lee. -. February 25, 2020. 356.

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  • Międzynarodowy Booker 2020: ogłoszono długą listę ...

    ... i Ottilie Mulzet w roku 2015, a także Han Kang za „Wegetariankę” w przekładzie Deborah Smith (2016) i David Grossman za „A Horse Walks Into a Bar” (tł.

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  • Master Second Look: Vijay looks terrific in a black suit ...

    Talking about Silenced, it is a South Korean drama movie based on the novel The Crucible by Gong Ji-young. The story of Silenced revolves around events that

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  • Một giải phẫu về bản chất bạo lực tồn tại trong con người

    Han Kang đã viết những gì? Ký ức đã phải tỉnh thức bao lần, nỗi đau phải bám trụ ra sao, để tái dựng nên những đau thương dẫu chết đi cũng còn khắc

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  • Quién sabe si mañana seguiremos aquí

    Kim Young-Ha nos escribió la historia con empatía, expresando lo que en verdad se siente ante la desaparición de un ser querido mientras el otro se pierde a

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  • Regresa Han Kang, la autora de "La vegetariana", con su ...

    A partir de la redacción aparentemente banal de una lista de cosas blancas, Han Kang hace un conmovedor ejercicio de introspección, buscando el epicentro de

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  • Review: 'The Only Child' arrives as Korean thrillers come of age

    For me, the first harbinger of Korean lit as a global phenomenon was Kyung-Sook Shin's “Please Look after Mom,” a bestselling South Korean literary novel

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  • Review: Diary of a Murderer and Other Stories by Kim Young-Ha

    ... Asia, which early this year has seen Bae Suah's Untold Night and Day and Cho Nam-joo's '#MeToo bestseller' Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982, among many others.

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  • Sexism, mental health, hypocrisy ... Cho Nam-joo's novel 'will ...

    Riveting, original and uncompromising, this is the most important book to have emerged from South Korea since Han Kang's The Vegetarian. “This is a book

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  • Untold Night and Day by Bae Suah review – a dreamlike quest

    Untold Night and Day was first published in Korea in 2013 and is the fourth of Bae Suah's novels – which number more than a dozen – to be translated into

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  • Vedere l'amore

    Prenditi cura di lei (di Kyung-Sook Shin, Neri Pozza, Vicenza 2011) è la storia di un amore fatto così. È la vita di una madre, che si chiama Park So-nyo.

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.53

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  • When students rise in protest, in the pages of novels: Six ...

    The South Korean novelist Han Kang's second novel to be translated into English by Deborah Smith, Human Acts, begins with the uprisings that take place at

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  • [Book면 톱] Popular Seoul National University lectures comes ...

    “Violence and Justice” is divided into three parts and offers analyses of 20 literary works, including Man Booker International-winning writer Han Kang's “The

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  • Представители Южной Кореи примут участие в книжной ...

    ... также участие представители министерства культуры, спорта и туризма Южной Кореи и Корейского института литературных переводов (LTI Korea).

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  • Necessary or True Happenstances: An Introduction to the Work of Hye Young-Pyun

    “O. Cuniculi” is featured in Hye Young-Pyun’s third collection of short stories, Evening Courtship, for which she was awarded the prestigious Dong-in Literature Prize last year. The story begins one night in a park when a man on temporary assignment out in the country is captivated by the red eyes of a rabbit “whose white fur had turned filthy.” The man brings the rabbit home inside his shirt. But he will soon regret it, and in the end he will not know how to get rid of it. At the conclusion of his temporary assignment the man must return to the city where he is from. Will he, like so many other city people, secretly abandon his rabbit in the middle of the night? After seeing the rabbit’s red eyes, this becomes more and more difficult for the man to contemplate. At one point the narrator notes that raising pet rabbits had been a huge fad for city children, but now it was the parents’ unpleasant duty to secretly dispose of these unwanted pets. Who are the parents of those children? From the time they get up to go to work, throughout the work day, through the hurried lunch hour, people endure the endless sameness and repetition of their urban existence. When they return home at the end of the work day there is another redundant cycle of evening meals, night, sleep, the same dreams, and once again, another day dawns the same as yesterday.  Just like the rabbit’s cage and its tomb—one and the same space.Hye Young-Pyun’s  literary debut was in the 2000 Seoul Shinmun spring literary contest with the short story, “Shaking off the Dew.” The theme Pyun confronts repeatedly throughout her work is that of the contemporary urban condition characterized by the horror of daily repetition and sameness. She dramatizes the current irony of our lives, in which the civilized is savage and the savage civilized. But Pyun’s world is not as gloomy as the dark nighttime parks, garbage dumps, construction sites, or sewers that serve as the backdrops of her stories. She reveals to us the value of confronting the abyss. When you read her work there are profoundly uncomfortable moments, but, ultimately, after you close the book, you experience that “Ah” moment when something has been illuminated.  Pyun’s stories allow us to consider stepping forward to endure the depths.Pyun was born in Seoul in 1972. She received her undergraduate degree in creative writing and a graduate degree in Korean Literature from Hanyang University. For the next decade, she worked at a range of office jobs—the frequent appearance of office workers in her stories comes from her experiences during that period. The “office worker” who repeats the same action is a unique feature in Pyun’s work, a new archetypal character in contemporary South Korean literature. A prominent Korean literary critic once said of Pyun that her stories presented “a risky path” in Korean literature. Now we can safely say that, in her stories, she has taken a giant step on this risky path. She takes us into a unique and concrete world, which resembles nothing else, while she maintains a keen interest in the “necessary or true happenstances” that characterize our lives.Pyun’s works include the short-story collections AOI Garden, To the Kennels, Evening Courtship,” and the novel, Ashes and Red.  She is the winner of the 40th Korea Times Literary Award (2007), the Yi Hyo-seok Literature Prize (2009), the Today’s Young Writer Award (2010) and the Dong-in Literature Prize (2011).  —Jo Kyung RanRead more from the February 2012 issueFurther ReadingO. CuniculiIt was a November of bitter rain and snow blackened by useGod, the mother claimed, is behind every tree in the forest

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  • 2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Deborah Smith

    By Eric M. B. BeckerDeborah Smith's translations from the Korean include two novels by Han Kang, The Vegetarian (shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize) and Human Acts, and two by Bae Suah, A Greater Music and Recitation. In 2015 Deborah completed a PhD at SOAS on contemporary Korean literature and founded Tilted Axis, a not-for-profit press focusing on contemporary fiction from Asia. In 2016 she won the Arts Foundation Award for Literary Translation. She tweets as @londonkoreanist. Words Without Borders (WWB): What drew you to Han Kang's work?​Deborah Smith (DS): The way she probes some of the darkest, most violent aspects of humanity with perfectly calibrated stylistic restraint; the way her prose style is influenced by her work as a poet, inflecting it with both lyricism and jaggedness; that each of her books show the influence of the South Korean model, where writers officially “debut” with short stories and continue to switch back and forth throughout their career, resulting in hybrid forms which often privilege tone and atmosphere over character or plot. And the way she deliberately repurposes certain features of Korean literary history—so-called “passive protagonists”—and of the Korean language itself—ambiguity, what we might call redundancy—to startling effect. WWB: What was unique about this translation compared to others you'd done?DS: It got published! It was my first one. So, my Korean was uniquely bad. I had to consult a dictionary uniquely often.WWB: What are you reading now, or which writers from the language and literary tradition you translate do you think readers ought to pay attention to as potential future MBI winners?DS: I just finished Mend the Living, which means I’ve now read seven from the long list! For me, Han Kang and Bae Suah are South Korea’s greatest contemporary writers—they’re the two I’ve chosen to translate, and I’m currently on my third book by each. The Bae Suah translations will be out in the US soon, so when I find a UK publisher, she could be a contender, though she’s far more experimental than Han Kang. Hwang Jungeun is my (and Han’s) hot tip from the younger generation—my company, Tilted Axis, publishes her prize-winning novel One Hundred Shadows this September, translated by Jung Yewon. Of our other writers, Hamid Ismailov is definitely one to watch—his Russian novels have already received rave reviews, and we’re now bringing out the books he wrote in Uzbek, translated by Donald Rayfield, who taught himself the language specifically for this project. YOU MAY ALSO LIKE: An excerpt from Han Kang's novel "The Vegetarian," translated by Deborah Smith (WWB's April 2014 Issue)More interviews with 2016 Man Booker International Prize-nominated writers and translatorsPublished Apr 12, 2016   Copyright 2016 Eric M. B. BeckerReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • A Language Is a Window: An Interview with Krys Lee

    By Jessie ChaffeeImage: Krys Lee. Photograph by Matt Douma.Words Without Borders caught up with writer and translator Krys Lee. Her novel How I Became a North Korean was just published by Viking/Penguin Random House.Words Without Borders (WWB): You write in English and translate from Korean. What inspired you to begin working as a translator, and does your work as a translator influence your fiction and how you think about language?Krys Lee (KL): Years ago over brunch, Young-ha Kim, a Korean writer I respect, asked me if I was interested in translating. I had translated short stories and poems before whenever the opportunity arose, as I was always interested in Korean literature. I also have a strong interest in languages and literature from around the world in general, so whether it is Korean or Italian, what originally drives me is a desire to read the national literature in the original language. This led me to work on longer novel projects. I ended up translating Young-ha Kim’s novel, and it will be published next year.WWB: In thinking about your personal relationship with language, do English and Korean (and now Italian) play different roles in your life? And have you ever considered writing fiction in a language other than English?KL: All three languages—English, Korean, and now, Italian—seem to mark phases of my life. I also become a slightly different person in each language, particularly in Korean, as the culture is, literally and metaphorically, another world, which is reflected in every sentence and inflection of the language. A language is a window, a different way of seeing, and my hunger for the languages and literatures of the world has much to do with a desire to see and understand as much of the world as possible. As well, I suspect, each language feeds a hunger in me to also become a different person. I’m also hoping to start Japanese classes in the next year or two, with no clear goal except that I have a passion for learning, and learning a language opens worlds.A language is a window, a different way of seeing.If I ever wrote in another language, it would be in Korean since I’ve lived over half my life so far in Seoul and I am engaged to a Korean man who speaks no English. I’m part of a generation that immigrated in reverse back to the country of their parents’ origins, and I have made my home here. It still feels like an audacious thing to say, however, as I’m not even satisfied with the way I write in English yet. A language is a journey, and each journey is a rich, endless quest with no point and no end. I do have one Korean language project that I’ll start next summer with my partner, however, which is a screenplay. I hadn’t planned for it, but while we were travelling, an idea that seemed right for a screenplay came to me fully formed. I wait for and trust those moments—when an idea comes to me in the form of a short story, novel, poem, or screenplay. Since my partner works in the Korean TV industry and understands the screenplay form far better than I do, my next project will be in the Korean language.WWB: Your first book, Drifting House, was a collection of short stories that focused primarily on the experiences of South Koreans and Korean immigrants in the United States. Your novel, How I Became a North Korean, is about North Korean defectors in China. How did the experience of writing in these two mediums—short form and long form—differ? With regard to the content, was there a specific reason that you decided to explore the experience of North Korean refugees at this moment in history and in your own life?KL: Each genre feels so distinct from the other. Stephen King once said that a short story is a love affair, and a novel is a marriage. The intensity of each short story was thrilling and emotionally taxing, but the promise of completion was always there. A novel is a test of willpower and faith, and a humbling experience. One fails and fails again. The rhythm oscillates between fear and occasional delight and happiness—like life, at least the way that I experience life.The years before I began How I Became a North Korean all led to the novel. I had been friends with North Korean activists and North Korean refugees before I began writing fiction, and when I first began a second book, I had deliberately tried not to write about the North Korean issues because I felt it was their story, not mine, and I didn’t want to appropriate stories. But as I struggled to write a novel based in Los Angeles’s Koreatown, and a few North Korean friends urged me to write their story for them because someone had to tell it right, I realized that the novel I was writing wasn’t working since the material felt distant from me. In contrast, the North Korean refugee issue was one I was intimately involved in and passionate about. And once I was asked to help in the border area of China and later, became disillusioned with what I saw, my anger and sadness grew, and watered the seed that became my novel How I Became a North Korean.WWB: Both of your books are filled with vibrant characters. Though some of them are wrestling with similar conflicts, each one is unique and absolutely real with a distinctive voice and perspective. Where do you find your characters? How do they come to you?KL: Each of my characters has a different part of me inside them, and certainly a lot of what I learned and who I knew informed my characters, but in the end the journey of writing a novel is learning who your characters are. As you also know, being a writer yourself, you learn your characters better than you do most “real” people you know your entire life. That kind of intimacy doesn’t come quickly, or easily.You learn your characters better than you do most “real” people you know your entire life. That kind of intimacy doesn’t come quickly, or easily.WWB: One of the most prominent themes in How I Became a North Korean is the many selves that are contained with us—the people we are in different contexts, cultures, languages, etc.—as well as the selves that get left behind. This is, of course, even more apparent when people are living in exile. “It is as though we were shedding our very selves to become someone else,” Jangmi thinks as she crosses the Tumen River to China. Is this something that you relate to as a writer or in your own life? And in your work as a translator—bringing narratives from one language to another—are there things that you have found to be untranslatable, that get lost in the crossing? KL: You picked up on this! There are many sentences that haunt me in this book because they are so close to my life, and this is one of them. I had a pretty dramatic and difficult early life that I’m not going to get into here, but part of it required me to move homes every few years. Later in college an academic scholarship allowed me to transport myself to England, and then I began life again in Korea. My “self” was dramatically different at home, at church as the pastor’s daughter, in different languages and cultures, and each time I longed for a new life and new beginning—most likely because I didn’t like being me. I romanticized Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. Each book was a different self. So when I became friends with North Koreans, I recognized the impulse in many of them to create a new self equally out of a desire for a new start and out of a longing to escape. But of course, an entirely new self is a fiction.One translates out of a faith in and love for a language, then realizes that the gaps between two languages will betray each time.Translation is a strange art. One translates out of a faith in and love for a language, then realizes that the gaps between two languages will betray each time. Many translators tend to translate books that are more “translatable” as a result. Books that do not seem as accessible in terms of language and culture, despite their merit, tend to be neglected. I’m guilty of the same tendencies. I read the poems of Kim Hye Soon years ago, and had a sudden desire to translate the fierce, original poems. The elaborate repetition and rhythmic line were impossible to replicate, however, and without the unique music of the line, I didn’t feel satisfied. Essentially, I lost courage.WWB: In your recent interview with Han Kang, you asked whether there are ideas and obsessions that she returns to—that haunt her. Are there themes that you find yourself returning to again and again in your writing?KL: There are so many themes I return to, some of which overlap with Han Kang’s, which was why we were delighted to read one another’s work and recognize our shared preoccupations. I return to the subjects of violence, religion, and issues of identity and the self—or, more accurately, they return to me. The struggle to survive and the need for control also figure largely, as do loneliness and love, the one frail possibility to escape the human condition of solitude.Krys Lee is the author of the short story collection Drifting House and the novel How I Became a North Korean, both published by Viking, Penguin Random House. Her translation of Young-ha Kim’s novel I Hear Your Voice is forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. She is a recipient of the Rome Prize and the Story Prize Spotlight Award, the Honor Title in Adult Fiction Literature from the Asian/Pacific American Libraries Association, and a finalist for the BBC International Story Prize. Her fiction, journalism, and literary translations have appeared in Granta, The Kenyon Review, Narrative, the San Francisco Chronicle, Corriere della Sera, and The Guardian, among others. She is an assistant professor of creative writing and literature at Yonsei University, Underwood International College, in South Korea.Further Reading:Young-ha Kim’s story “The Man Who Sold His Shadow” in the November 2005 issue: “Seoul Searching”An excerpt from Han Kang’s “The Vegetarian” in the April 2014 issue: “Writing from South Korea”The September 2003 issue: “Writing From North Korea.”Published Aug 3, 2016   Copyright 2016 Jessie ChaffeeReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • Literary Translation Centre: The Makers of World Literature at the London Book Fair

    By Jennifer AdcockWith a full program of seminars over three days, each packed with dozens of extremely enthusiastic translators, to say that the buzz was palpable at Literary Translation Centre would be an understatement. From what I hear, this has been the biggest space allocated to the LTC yet, which has been growing steadily over the past five years. Sponsored by AmazonCrossing, funded by Arts Council England and the Foyle Foundation, and with partners such as the BCLT, English PEN, British Council, Free Word, Translators Association, Literature Across Fronteirs, Wales Literature Exchange, and Words Without Borders, the LTC provides a hub for translators. It is almost a mini-fair in itself, taking center stage in the making of world literature at the London Book Fair, which is second only to Frankfurt as a mecca for publishers, international rights sales, and current trends in the industry. Within this context, the LTC gives translators a tremendous boost; it offers fresh ideas to discuss, and an invaluable opportunity to meet and chat with other translators, as well as with publishers, agents, and editors, at the very handy area with tables and chairs provided for people to mingle. With Korea as this year’s LBF Market Focus, we learned that Korean literature is surprisingly underrepresented in the UK publishing world in comparison to other East Asian literature. This only reinforced the importance of passionate translators who will bridge world literatures together and act as champions of their favorite authors and books.The seminars covered everything from Back to Basics Q // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • Notes on Writing and Translating in Korea Today

    By Jennifer AdcockWith Korea being this year’s Market Focus at the London Book Fair, there was a multitude of events exploring the publishing potential around this country, revealing a whole universe of literature to be read, and of course, translated. The “Writing and Translating in Korea Today” seminar at the Literary Translation Centre gave a succinct overview of the Korean literary landscape. The panelists were all translators as well as authors. Krys Lee, author of Drifting House, was born in South Korea, grew up in the United States, studied in both the US and the UK, and is a professor of Creative Writing at Yonsei University’s Underwood International College. Author Shirley Lee was born in South Korea, received an English education while growing up in China, and has been widely published; her focus is translating North Korean literature. Brother Anthony of Taize, a scholar specializing in Korean poetry, lives in Seoul, became a naturalized citizen of Korea in 1994, and has translated some thirty books of Korean literature. The discussion was chaired by Cortina Butler, Director of Literature at the British Council.The event kicked off with a discussion about whether Korean literature in translation offered a fair sampling of what is being published in the original language. Contemporary long -form fiction is the most represented, while short fiction—a form with a strong tradition in Korea—as well as poetry, are not as widely published in translation. Older classics, as well as fiction written in Korea’s regional dialects, are also underrepresented, perhaps due to the huge challenges presented in translating these texts. Thankfully, Dalkey Archive Press and the Literature Translation Institute of Korea are helping to rectify this situation with the Library of Korean Literature Project—an unprecedented effort to bring Korean literature into the English language. In a single year, from 2013-2014, 25 novels and short-story collections were published thanks to this collaboration.It was interesting to note that although the more established, canonical writers who are well-known in Korea are the ones who tend to get translated, the younger writers might be more in tune with the tastes of the contemporary world. This new generation is reading more foreign literature than their own, and is also receiving an education in creative writing, often choosing to write in English in order to reach a wider audience. It was mentioned that younger writers tend to have a lighter and more humorous style in comparison to their more established counterparts.Along with Korea’s painful political separation came the separation of the Korean language. The South Korean language is changing a lot more rapidly from the influence of English and German, which infiltrate through street signs, textbooks, and commercials. North Koreans thus have the experience of walking around as if in a foreign language when they travel to South Korea for the first time. This is not only due to the influence from abroad, but also to the whole culture in which the language lives. Shirley Lee described, for example, how a North Korean was surprised to see that adjectives like “respected” or “dear,” which are normally reserved for the leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-un, can also be used to refer to other people or things. Additionally, many Korean writers are choosing to write in English. This could be due to the fact that they are living in the diaspora, or because they are schooled in English and therefore feel more comfortable with their writing skills in the language, or because they are making the conscious decision to write in English in order to reach a broader audience.Another fascinating piece of the Korean literary puzzle is the odd fact that until the 20th century, Korean literature was written in classical Chinese. Then, from 1910 to 1945, with the annexation by Japan, people were taught to read or write in Japanese instead of Korean. Therefore, between 1945 and 1950, there was an explosion of creativity, where writers were reinventing their own language afresh. This outburst was cut short, in 1950, though, when these writers went to war or were kidnapped, so there is not much history of the literature written in Korean before 1953.The panelists went on to discuss the particular challenges of bringing Korea’s literature to an English-speaking audience. The obvious issue, of course, is making it understandable outside of its cultural context, with things such as the hierarchy of titles, and the different ranks indicated in dialogue being quite difficult to convey in English. Krys Lee mentioned that one way around this would be to really work with the register to try and signal the levels of formality versus informality. Another challenge is the fact that Korean literature gets edited a lot less, creating situations where the English translation of a novel was cut by a third, to tighten up the pacing and secondary stories.Brother Anthony of Taize rounded off the discussion on a beautiful note, by reading from his translation of Some Advice by Ko Un:Poemsblock the path for better poems.Poemsblock the path for subsequent poems.Poems, poems, my blue poems!Escape somehow from the history of poetry,from fashions of poetry,from a hundred years of poetic authority.Be born trembling, wild and alone.Published Apr 16, 2014   Copyright 2014 Jennifer AdcockReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • Marilyn Monroe and Lady Gaga’s Korea, and Korean Literature

    Marilyn Monroe came to South Korea in February of 1954. While honeymooning in Tokyo with Joe DiMaggio, she had boarded a military plane and was en route to Seoul even before the marriage was fully consummated. At the airport, she was swarmed by hundreds of GIs who had been awaiting her arrival. When she came down the gangway, Monroe was dressed in a flight suit. Reporters noted that “half of the buttons on the top were undone, offering tantalizing glimpses of her chest, which got the troops even more riled up.” According to Korean news reports from the time, the GIs were disappointed to see her immediately board a helicopter bound for the frontlines and asked her when she would return, to which she “turned on the charm like a mother comforting a child” and replied, “I’ll be right back.” By February of 1954, the Korean War, which had lasted for three years, had already been brought to an end under the pretext of a ceasefire, but tens of thousands of American soldiers were still stationed in South Korea. Monroe gave dozens of performances, visited wounded soldiers in field hospitals, and posed on top of tanks. In archival photos, the soldiers’ excitement as they greet her is palpable. In colorless, dirt-covered barracks, Monroe alone stands out in color, as if someone had come along later and photoshopped her into the pictures. Before thousands of soldiers seated on a low hill devoid of even a single tree, she spreads her arms wide and sings in time with a piano. The images look like they could have come from a 1960s rock festival.Yeouido Island, where Monroe alighted from the plane that brought her from Tokyo, is now the center of Seoul. It is crowded with high-rise buildings that house television stations and finance companies. The spot where the airport once stood has been turned into a park. Monroe died never having said anything special about Korea. Which is how it had to be. Because the Korea that she saw in 1954 would have been nothing more than scorched earth, razed to the ground by bombs and cheering GIs.About half a century after Monroe visited Korea, Lady Gaga came to call. She was giving a concert sponsored by the Korean credit card company Hyundai Card. While Monroe had worn a flight suit, Gaga wore a mask. Where she did resemble Monroe was in her deeply low-cut dress that offered tantalizing glimpses of her chest. The concert was held in April of this year. Though the Korean War has long been over, the scale of U.S. troops stationed in Korea has not lessened much. But Lady Gaga was not here to “comfort” the troops. Instead, she gave what was for her a very modest performance for the tens of thousands of fans, as well as board members of Hyundai Card and their VIP customers, who attended the concert. Also in attendance outside of the concert arena were protestors. You might think they were all old-timers who cling to Confucian tradition, but in fact the protests were led by conservative Christian groups who are influenced by evangelical Christianity in the United States. The close connection between Korean Christianity and American evangelical tradition likewise dates back to the Korean War. After the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Japan surrendered, the U.S. military entered the Korean peninsula and established a military government. Then the Korean War took place, followed by a succession of pro-American dictatorships in South Korea. To the eyes of Koreans, who had suffered through Japanese colonialism and civil war, the United States was the strongest country in the world, and therefore the God that Americans believed in must also be all-powerful. Korean Christianity grew and grew, and they opposed Lady Gaga just as conservative American Christians did.Lady Gaga spent three days and two nights in Korea. Of the news reports detailing her movements, the one that caught my attention was a story that took place in a Korean restaurant, where she had gone to eat with her entourage. According to the report, she ate the banchan, the small dishes that accompany a Korean meal, with her hands instead of the chopsticks that had been set out. The January 2012 issue of Vanity Fair describes her wearing Chanel and skillfully making whole-wheat pasta at her parents’ house on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Somehow I doubt she ate that pasta with her fingers. If she had, the reporter would have been sure to include such an amusing detail. Yet three months after that interview took place, Lady Gaga was eating with her hands in a hotel restaurant in Seoul. Perhaps someone had given her the wrong information. Koreans consider it impolite to eat with one’s hands. Nevertheless, Gaga was not criticized for it. It was merely seen as amusing. Perhaps that is because she is not only famous for her eccentric behavior but was also a guest from a faraway place. But if eating with her fingers was not part of her unique style of eccentricity, then it’s interesting. Throughout her stay in Korea, she barely did anything provocative that would make her audience uncomfortable. Instead, it was her excessively well-behaved and courteous behavior that drew attention. Given the way she behaved during her trip to Korea, eating banchan with her fingers may have even been a kind of gesture of respect. For Koreans, the difference between eating with chopsticks and eating with your hands is like night and day, but for Lady Gaga, there may have been little difference at all. Perhaps in her mind, there is the culture of forks and knives and the “other” culture of everything else.The Korea that Marilyn Monroe saw was a battleground. The Koreans that Lady Gaga imagined were people who eat with their fingers. Sixty years have passed since Marilyn Monroe boarded a propeller plane and flew here to visit American GIs, but it is possible that views of Korea from the outside have not changed very much. Korea still brings to mind words like war, division, nuclear North Korea, and the Great Leader Kim Jong-il. In literature, as well, the first works to be translated were those that included such themes. Of course, Gaga’s generation is a bit different from Monroe’s. They are more interested in Korean culture than politics (which isn’t very cool), and probably give little thought to an old war that broke out in the 1950s or in a Stalinist state where students march in lockstep down city streets. They probably see Korea as a country of exotic foods and strange living habits. To them, Korea seems to be symbolized by bulgogi and bibimbap, boy groups wearing makeup who command legions of girl fans, and art films rife with cruelty and violence. I encountered both stereotypes frequently while living in New York for two years. The real Korea lies somewhere between, or perhaps somewhere beyond, Monroe’s Korea and Gaga’s Korea. And as is the case with any country’s serious literature, Korean writers are fighting these stereotypes and working to create their own world. In particular, after the 1990s, when Korea’s economic development accelerated, Korean literature broke free of nationalistic narcissism, the struggle against dictatorship, and the epic narratives of national division and the trauma of war, and began to focus on conspicuously individual issues. Writers who had devoted themselves to social issues began to look inward and question what they could do through language and through fiction. The result was the astonishing diversification of Korean literature. Now, in 2012, I can say that it is all but impossible to briefly summarize current trends in Korean literature.For this special issue, I selected two short stories. I had hoped to include Park Mingyu’s “Is That So? I’m a Giraffe,” but the story has already appeared in the Asia Literary Review. The stories are all departures from the kinds of stereotypes that readily come to mind when one speaks of Korea or of Korean literature, but at the same time, they show what Korean literature is like at present.Sim Sangdae’s “Beauty,” written in a mythic style, takes place in a run-down coal mining town. The town, which was once prosperous but is now in ruins, is probably similar to the image of Korea that Monroe would have seen from the airplane: denuded mountains, scorched earth, colorless beings scraping out a living. But even back then, there were those who went to extremes in search of beauty. And that ill-matched aesthetic impulse ends tragically.Yun Ko-eun is the youngest of the three writers. Her story, "The Chef's Nail," which was written in 2011, also takes place on the subway. But it is different from Park’s subway of ten years ago. Park’s pushers are left behind on the platform when the train leaves, but Yun’s characters ride the “Circle Line” around the city all day. For these people, whose job is to advertise books by pretending to read them, the subway is an inescapable reality, a Mobius strip. Their only way out is to become the books that they are selling, and in the end, that is what happens. They are easily replaced and disposed of. In 2011, South Korea was economically more affluent, and yet the prospects for young people in this country have never been bleaker and less stable.Several months after Hyundai Card invited Lady Gaga to Korea, they also invited Eminem. In the middle of his concert, Eminem raised his arms to form a heart and perplexed the audience, who had been expecting bad manners and crude gestures. Both Lady Gaga and Eminem were so polite and well-behaved. They probably meant no ill intent whatsoever when they ate with their fingers and made hearts with their arms. We all live with misunderstandings about others. And sometimes that’s the more comfortable path. But isn’t literature an art that struggles to overcome stereotypes and easy misunderstandings? I hope that the readers of this special edition will enjoy these three unfamiliar stories from South Korea sent to them from afar. © Kim Young-ha. By arrangement with the author. Translation © 2012 by Sora Kim-Russell. All rights reserved.Read more from the December 2012 issueFurther ReadingBeautyThe Chef’s Nailfrom “Nanga”

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  • From the Translator: Totalitarian Capitalism in a Windowless Room

    By Jamie ChangIn the winter of 2007, I ditched my plans to go to medical school and chose Mouthwatering by Kim Aeran as my first translation project. Like all derailing decisions I’ve made in my life that in time proved sound, a woman was behind it.Her name was Saein. She wanted to be a poet. Before I met her, the Korean section of my personal library consisted of just two names: Wan-suh Park (author of Who Ate Up All the Shinga?) and Lee Yeongdo (a big name in Korean fantasy fiction; my life revolved around Dragon Raja when I was in the ninth grade). Not long after we started going out, Saein took me to a bookstore and pointed out Kim Aeran’s first short story collection, Run, Daddy! She explained to me why the eponymous “Daddy” was running (to have sex), and giggled to herself. At the time, I was an insufferable undergrad who only read “serious” literature, so I didn’t bother to check out the book. It wasn’t until nearly two years after Saein and I broke up that I happened upon Mouthwatering in the new books section of a bookstore and actually read a Kim Aeran story.Most stories in Mouthwatering, the short-story collection that includes “Ascending Scales,” are about young Koreans, many of them students, inhabiting uninhabitable spaces—gosiwon (a boardinghouse of sorts with small, often windowless rooms intended for people studying for civil service exams), basement apartments that flood every summer, chicken coop dorm rooms, shady love motels, rooftop rooms—and the absurd physical discomfort that shape and characterize the experience of youth there. Even though the stories were often laugh-out-loud funny, I noticed that they simultaneously incited an uneasy, visceral reaction. I felt very tense and anxious even as I translated them at a spacious library in Western Massachusetts. The familiar dread, I realized, was coming from my own familiarity with those spaces. Like so many Koreans who came of age around the turn of the century and thereafter, I had first-hand experience with those uncomfortable rooms. I shared a nine-square-meter dorm room with three other girls (“Crossing the Meridian”), visited my wife in her gosiwon room the size of a pantry (“Prayer”), and spent many nights in unsavory love motels with Saein (“Christmas Specials”). These places were widely accepted as the norm, a rite of passage of sorts that were romanticized as a necessary, dehumanizing part of becoming a “grown up”—a spatial embodiment of gojingamnae, or “after pain comes sweet reward.”All of us who lived and studied in these places agreed that there was something unethical and unjust about the way we lived and the way we competed with one another. Mouthwatering tackles a rather large problem that contributes to the unhappiness that plagues Korean youth: the peculiarities inspired by the combination of education, capitalism, and totalitarianism. Whether it is outsourcing grading papers (“Mouthwatering”), or standing in line all night to sign up for classes at a test-prep center:One kid brought a picnic blanket, another napped squatting. Kids left their bags with their friends to go to the bathroom. More than ten hours remained until registration time. Dawn came, and the crowd grew even larger. The line waxed from single file to three to four people across. [. . .] Approximately a thousand people had gathered. [. . .] I heard cries and screams. The girl in front of me broke into sobs, “Don’t push me. Don’t push me. Please . . .” (“Crossing the Meridian.” Mouthwatering, p138).But at the same time, we espoused “after pain comes sweet reward” as our religion, as South Korea raced headlong toward the extreme end of capitalism. When we complained, the answer that came back was the same answer the protagonist of “Ascending Scales” gets from the landlord when mold grows on her walls: That’s just how it is.Uncannily, just like the protagonist of “Ascending Scales,” Saein shared a small place with her older sister and their tiny terrier. Their landlady lived one floor above them and often peeked in. The winter I was visiting, she asked how long I was staying and charged extra rent. Saein, too, headed down to the boiler room with a basin and some rags and scooped water out of the boiler room when the pipe froze and burst down there. Saein’s older sister gave up her studies to provide for the family when their unemployed father passed away. Now that Saein had finished college, it was her turn to bear the financial burden as her sister resumed her studies. Each bound by family obligations and with no help from the government, so many young people gave up their savings, time, and youth to support other family members and slowly dig them out of financial predicaments. The stories in Mouthwatering are not about people under extraordinarily unfortunate circumstances, but familiar personal narratives of so many young Koreans who sought to better their circumstances through education in the post-IMF Korea.Many young Korean writers today write about the disillusionment with the future they were promised—the promise of social justice, the promise that hard work would be rewarded.  As Kim Young-ha said in an interview with BBC, the previous generation of writers who lived through the horrors of the Korean War and the Democracy Movements often dismisses the disappointment of the younger generation as trivial. But I think the true horror is the possibility that the previous generation’s economic and political achievements, based on tremendous sacrifices, are in danger of coming apart in every sense of the expression.Saein didn’t become a poet after all, but instead chose a career in the Korean test-prep empire to support her sister, who’s been studying for the law exam for the last five years. They still live in the same place with the flooding boiler room. But the tiny terrier is still alive.     Published Apr 28, 2014   Copyright 2014 Jamie ChangReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • Before Han Kang: Three Korean Modernists You Should Know

    By Esther KimIm Hwa (left), Yi Sang (right, seated), and Pak Taewon (right, standing). Wikipedia. Before K-pop or K-beauty, there was Korean literature. Before the vivid, strange writing in translation of contemporary South Korean writers (including Han Kang, Hwang Jungeun, and Bae Suah) and writers of the Korean-American diaspora (such as Min Jin Lee, Patty Park, and Alexander Chee), there was literature being produced in the the city of Keijō—or Gyeongseong—where Seoul now stands. Under the rule of Imperial Japan, Keijo/Gyeongseong developed into a capital. Urbanization and colonization shaped modern Korean writers until the end of the Second World War, when Japan retreated. Seoul’s painful history has been razed and the city does not readily divulge its previous incarnation.   With the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in 1894, Japan launched a policy of territorial expansion that claimed Taiwan and Korea, among other countries. This policy indelibly marked the Korean peninsula, which was under Japanese rule from 1910–45. During this period, a generation of writers established successful careers. As in Taiwan, these Koreans were educated, spoke and wrote in Japanese, and had little or no memory of precolonial life. Later generations caught in the tumult of twentieth-century politics would judge them mercilessly. Many of the young men attended university in Tokyo, an epicenter of the arts, and returned to Keijo/Gyeongseong to contribute to the budding literary scene. They wrote under increasingly fraught political circumstances, which came to a head in 1940 when the Imperial State cracked down, banning the use of Korean entirely and even rounding up and torturing the creators of a Korean-language dictionary.Colonized artists struggled to imagine a future—nationalist or communist—and record it in their mother tongue, a language on the verge of extinction.Despite the darkness of the period, or perhaps because of it, those who lived and wrote under colonial rule slyly thumbed their noses at Japanese officials and censors. During this period of hope, grief, and rage, extraordinary forms of writing under pressure began to emerge in Keijo/Gyeongseong—fragmented, cyclical, and episodic. As Imperial Japan introduced avant-garde literature and fiery political ideologies to the peninsula, colonized artists struggled to imagine a future—nationalist or communist—and record it in their mother tongue, a language on the verge of extinction.The entrance of European ideas to the peninsula, which had been relatively untouched by foreign influence as compared to China or Japan, meant interplay in the literature, especially in the 1920s. The March 1, 1919 Uprising against Imperial Japan, famously led by young female students, allowed for a lively albeit short publishing boom. New literary magazines, such as Changjo and Sonyun, as well as newspapers like Chosun Ilbo and Dong A Ilbo, were founded during this period. European Dadaism, surrealism, and modernism in translation mingled with Korean pastoral, Japanese realism, and classical Chinese foundations. Imperial Japan also ironically brought Esperanto, the language of a more egalitarian utopia, to the peninsula, and the socialist cultural society Korea Artista Proletaria Federacio (KAPF) was founded in 1925. From Tagore to Baudelaire, Yeats to Tolstoy, new literatures influenced Korean writers living in the Japanese-appointed capital, and they, like many of their avant-garde European counterparts, questioned the ability of a mind to apprehend violence and the ability of language to represent that reality.The following modernist, urban writers created a daring new literature that was an important influence on contemporary Korean writing. 1.     Yi Sang (1910–37)Fans of Borges will admire the Dada-inflected and elliptical work of avant-garde poet and writer Yi Sang (born Kim Haekyong). Start with short story Wings from the anthology Modern Korean Fiction, edited by Bruce Fulton and Youngmin Kwon. Translated by Walter K. Lew and Youngju Ryu, Wings is an absurd, stream-of-consciousness short story on urban alienation.Yi Sang’s life itself begs a literary biography and collected works. Before his untimely death at the age of twenty-six, he worked as an architect and the geometrical constructions of his poems and stories reveal this training. He was a member of the notable “Circle of Nine”—or Guinhoe—a literary group devoted to “pure” aesthetics and introspection over pushing politics. He was best friends with modernist painter Gu Bonwoong. He lived with a young gisaeng (gisaengs were typically girls whose status lay somewhere between artist, courtesan, entertainer, and slave) in a house he constructed, which still stands today in the Seochon district of Keijo/Gyeongseong. He wrote mainly in Japanese. Today one of the most coveted literary prizes in South Korea is named after him. 2.     Pak Taewon (1909–86)A close friend of Yi Sang and fellow member of the Circle of Nine, writer Pak Taewon was educated in Tokyo and he translated short stories by Ernest Hemingway and Katherine Mansfield. Pak’s semiautobiographical novella, A Day in the Life of Kubo, the Novelist, sketches urban life in Gyeongseong, including its new department stores, Japanese- and Western-style architecture, and cafes, as the writer strolls through the colonial city. It owes much to James Joyce, who Pak read in Japanese translation, and the flaneur tradition. The novella was serialized in the newspaper Chosun Joongang Ilbo from August 1–September 19, 1934. Sensitive to the plight of the urban poor and women, Pak Taewon sought to depict life on the margins. After Korea became independent of colonial rule, he became a “Wolbuk writer,” meaning one who “crossed North,” in 1950 and worked there as a literary critic. 3.     Im Hwa (1908–53)The oldest of the three writers, Im Hwa had a clear influence on Yi Sang and Pak Taewon. He wrote poetry “of didactic intent” in the 1920s as one of the leaders of the socialist KAPF movement. Educated in Tokyo, he first fashioned himself as a Dadaist avant-garde poet and cineaste after Japanese poet Takahashi Shinkichi. Like Pak Taewon, he fled to the North in 1947, fearing the repressive military regime in the South and the dissolution of the Communist Party. He was later executed in the North on charges that he was a spy for both Imperial Japan and America.Read his poems “Storm Cloud—1927” and “Maps,” translated by Kevin Michael Smith, in Volume 10 of Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture. In “Maps,” Im Hwa writes with great poignancy, reflecting on the peninsula’s past and future:Even if the beautiful name of the youth will be buried in the earthwithout ever once having been called clearly,now henceforth we will becomeyoung painters of this new map—Isn’t it a joyous thing?The reception of these writers in South Korea is still colored by their politics. Up until 1988, two of the three—Pak Taewon and Im Hwa—were personae non gratae in South Korea, their works banned for their proletarian content. While some of Pak Taewon, Im Hwa, and Yi Sang’s most famous short stories and poems are available in academic anthologies and journals, I believe they deserve to be published by translation-focused presses such as NYRB Classics or New Directions. That they still don’t have literary biographies or collected works in English is practically a crime. But perhaps they will soon receive the recognition that they deserve.Published May 4, 2018   Copyright 2018 Esther KimReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

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  • "The Only Child" by Mi-ae Seo has many flaws

    In “The Only Child,” Korean author Mi-ae Seo delivers a sometimes frightening psychological thriller with echoes of “The Silence of the Lambs” and “The Bad

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  • Five authors of Korean thrillers you should be reading, by Paula Woods

    The list of top Korean crime novelists published in English — some of whom I’ve read, others I can’t wait to read — is woefully short but sure to grow. Some are pure mystery writers, others more literary but dabbling in the genre, as does much of the best writing coming from Korea today. There are voyages through Korean history, assassinations and suicides and bone-chilling family dramas, with a little of the phantasmagorical thrown in if that’s your thing. Make particular note of the forthcoming titles — signs of much more to come.

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  • New Korean major extends GW's 'demonstrated strength' in ...

    We have a lot of great faculty who teach Korean history, Korean politics, Korean language, Korean literature, so we're in a very unique position when it comes to

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  • Bert Archer / bert@bertarcher.com

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  • Bert Archer / bert@bertarcher.com

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  • 김승희 (Kim Seung-hee)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.52

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  • 김현 (Kim Hyun)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.51

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  • Call for Overseas Translation Workshop Program 2020

    Overseas Translation Workshop Program 2020Through the Overseas Translation Workshop Program, LTI Korea provides funding assistance for Korean literature translation workshops held abroad.We seek applications from overseas universities with Korean studies programs.1.Introduction: Our grants cover the costs of running a Korean literature translation workshop and inviting a Korean writer.2.Eligibility: Overseas universities with Korean language or Korean literature programs in all language groups are eligible to apply.※ Number of Recipients: around 15 universities (subject to change)3.Prerequisitesa)Faculty with the ability to guide a Korean literature translation workshop, and adequate facilities to run a translation workshop program for one term (at least one session per week for three months)b)At least 7 students with sufficient linguistic proficiency and literary understanding4.Grant Details: Support fund and the costs of inviting Korean writers.a)Partial funding towards operational costs and faculty fees-Faculty fees to be paid in accordance with the university’s pay scale.-Operational costs: coordinator fees, promotional and running costs, etc.b)We provide funding (travel expenses and honoraria) for inviting the Korean author/scholar of the set text to participate in the workshop.※ Unless in exceptional circumstances, we transfer the grant into the university’s bank account.※ The exact amount of the grant is decided in consideration of a number of factors including the total budget and local prices.※ The grant is paid in euros for countries using the euro and in US dollars for all other countries.5.Obligationsa)Korean literature translation seminars-Translate Korean literature (1 short story / 20 poems) into a foreign language. The chosen text must be fully translated during the seminars.-Period: 12 weeks (at least once a week)b)Korean literature translation workshop and author lecture-Period: 2~3 days-Workshop: QA and discussion with the author (or scholar) of the set text (at least two two-hour sessions)-Literary event: lecture for students in the Korean department or general readers, discussion with scholars and authors, readings (at least once)※ LTI Korea may request amendments to the university’s seminar/workshop/literary event proposal.c) Final report and proof of expenditure must be submitted within one month of the completion of the project.※ Please use the form provided by LTI Korea.6.Application and Selection Processa)Application Period: December 2, 2019 ~ January 5, 2020 (24:00 KST)b)How to Apply: Applications are accepted by email only (academy@klti.or.kr).c)Required Documents1) Application (in Korean or English). Please use the form provided.- Your application must include detailed information about the amount of funding requested, a budget plan, the workshop/seminar schedule, the set text and author, the department/program and participating students.※ The set text is to be finalized in consultation with LTI Korea.2) Resumes and personal statements of the teaching staff written in Korean or English (no set format).3) The pay scale of the universityd)Selection Criteria-Work experience of the selected faculty member(s)-The standards of the Korean department (students’ linguistic proficiency, participation of MA/PhD students, etc.)-Concreteness/feasibility of the workshop and seminar plan※ Priority will be given to the following:- Applications that include a plan to utilize the final translated text (publication, online posting, journal submission, application for translation grants, etc.)* If applicable, please state how translations from previous workshops were utilized.- Workshops in target languages not included in the Translation Academy's curriculum (English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese).e)Notification of Result: End of January 2020 (expected)7.Further Information- For enquiries, please contact Heesu Choi (+82 2 6919 7756 / academy@klti.or.kr).- Workshops scheduled for the first half of 2020 will be given preference.- Submitted documents will not be returned.- Translation seminars and workshops using an intermediary language are not eligible.

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  • Discovery of Solitude

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  • Unfinished Words

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  • Raising the swallow

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  • Brown Tears

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  • Sea and Butterfly

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  • Under the Fig Tree

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  • The Korean soldier

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  • Is That So? I'm a Giraffe

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  • To Believe in Love

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  • Linguistic Slapstick, Brutal Joy, and Profane Parrots: 18 Translators on Translating Humor

    By Jessie ChaffeeIn celebration of this month’s issue of International Humor, we asked top translators to share stories about the joys and challenges of translating humor, from puns to satire to creative curses.  Alta L. Price on Dana Grigorcea’s Double Meanings Jeon’s advice reminded me of an important lesson I learned early on in grad school. I had once complained to the brilliant Professor Youngjoo Son about having to read J. M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians in her class because I was disgusted by the narrator. She replied that I shouldn’t confuse the author with the narrator and should try reading the work ironically: wasn’t Coetzee somehow satirizing the voice, subtly sending up the narrator, mocking him, even laughing at him? In other words, have I tried reading him ironically? With this in mind, I went back to my 2010 manuscript and revised it with an awareness of this possibility of an ironic reading.That revised translation won an award last year. The prize money was, ironically, almost exactly the amount I was shorted in 2010. Antonia Lloyd-Jones on Maryla Szymiczkowa’s Whimsical Names When Zosia Krasodomska-Jones and I co-translated Krystyna Boglar’s children’s novel Clementine Loves Red, we decided that as the book was not firmly set in Poland, but could be just about anywhere, we would change the Polish names to English ones. One of the children was called, oddly, Jarzynka—the diminutive of jarzyna, “vegetable”—and the other children say how strange it is to be called “little vegetable.” But later in the book she turns out to be the daughter of Mr Jarzyna, hence her nickname. Despite its meaning, Jarzyna doesn’t sound strange as a Polish family name. I scoured lists of fruits and vegetables in search of ideas, and finally hit upon Macadamia as the name for the child, and then her father could be Mr MacAdam.But when I translated Maryla Szymiczkowa’s retro crime novel, Mrs Mohr Goes Missing, firmly set in 1890s Kraków, I couldn’t be so flexible. The crime-solving heroine is Pani Profesorowa Szczupaczyńska—Mrs-Professor’s-Wife-Unpronounceable. It sounds comical in Polish because it’s a mouthful to say and also because a szczupak is a pike, and fish names are always funny. But however fishy, a pike has razor-sharp teeth. All of which reflects the character of our heroine, a tough cookie, but one who sometimes prompts laughter. Sometimes I ask authors if I can change Polish names that to non-Poles look like car crashes, but this time I needed to keep the humor. I needed a name that (a) sounded credibly Polish; (b) included a fish; and (c) warned us not to laugh at her too much. The authors reminded me that there’s a Polish name “Heryng,” but that didn’t tick the boxes. After reading lists of fish names and Polish surnames, I invented a new one: Turbotyńska. OK, a turbot is a harmless flat fish, but it has turbo power. Bonnie Huie on Qiu Miaojin’s Love of Media IlliteracyDepressives can sometimes be the funniest people of all. Emotional vulnerability and dark psychological depths may typify Qiu Miaojin’s masterworks, but there is a whole other side to her literary alter ego that is both savage and goofy, and this can be seen in the satirical episodes of Notes of a Crocodile, which are narrated in the third person and draw upon the lowbrow language of everyday visual media.One such episode—which takes as its target mainstream Taiwanese newspapers and their sensationalistic coverage of a minority group referred to only as “crocodiles”—calls for the two-dimensionality of caricature. In a scene that could easily have been lifted from the panels of a comic strip, a naive “reader who called up the paper with an animal encyclopedia in hand” seeks information from a crass editor who answers the phone while “taking a bite of tuna sandwich.” Nothing could be farther from the fluid, abstract world of emotions and intellect inhabited by the alienated protagonist, Lazi, than this warped social reality, in which the entirety of one’s thoughts (and the essence of one’s character) can be flattened and reduced to the symbolic object in one’s hands. This zany prologue is followed by a spurt of other reader-editor exchanges that appear without speaker attribution, like a jumble of interjectory speech balloons. The interaction concludes in a mutual consensus to exercise stupidity, whereupon the exasperated editor, who wants to be asked the exact same question over and over so that it can be answered by a recording, instructs the reader: “Why don’t you just start with, ‘Can you tell me what the exact same question is?’” The reader replies: “That makes sense.” To render the artlessness of your fellow human beings, it takes a cold, cold heart.Read an excerpt from Qiu Miaojin’s Notes of a Crocodile, translated by Bonnie Huie Boris Dralyuk on Mikhail Zoshchenko’s Dark Hilarity I recently wrote a little piece about the deliciously maddening challenges of translating the great Soviet satirist Mikhail Zoshchenko—specifically, of translating his darkly hilarious Sentimental Tales. That meant undertaking the thankless task of explaining jokes . . . And here I am, explaining another one. I do so for a good cause, because it seems to me that jokes can teach us an important lesson about translating in general, the lesson of freedom: it’s always best to let one’s mind do a somersault or three before grabbing hold of the trapeze again.Early in the first tale of Zoshchenko’s cycle, our clumsy narrator explains the demise of a peripheral character. The original Russian, if translated “literally,” would read something like this: “Only the medical attendant Fyodor Perepenchuk died much earlier, and, to be exact, he didn’t die, that is, didn’t die his own death, but hanged himself.” That leaves a lot to be desired. First, the rhythm, which is beautifully halting in Russian, is just plain halting in English. More importantly, the core of the verbal humor—the fact that our narrator is constantly, unwittingly, undermining clichés and bringing dead metaphors to life—has gone out the window. In Russian, “to die one’s own death” is a fixed phrase, meaning “to die of natural causes.” By stumbling over it, our narrator points to the fact that hanging oneself is certainly a matter of taking one’s death into one’s own hands. To create a similar effect in English, I raided its native store of morbid euphemisms: “But the medical attendant Fyodor Perepenchuk was taken from us at an earlier date. Of course, it isn’t so much that he was taken from us as that he hanged himself.” The Russian Perepenchuk didn’t die his own death—but, then again, he very much did. Meanwhile, his English double wasn’t taken from us—but, then again, he very much was. After all, you can’t just leave a fella hanging. Take leaps, translators. Look alive! Bruna Dantas Lobato on Caio Fernando Abreu’s Brutal JoyCaio Fernando Abreu’s 1982 collection Moldy Strawberries gives life to the marginal underworld of the cities of Porto Alegre and São Paulo. Written during the military dictatorship in Brazil, the collection touches on censorship, homophobia, depression, and urban violence. The material is often so dark, so steeped in loss, that I worry I might not be “bleeding” enough on the page as I translate it—to quote the metaphor the author uses to describe his writing process. After the moments of tension in the stories, Abreu tends to release the pressure by cracking a joke or two, only to tighten his grip again immediately after. Here, humor dispels the tension so the stories’ darkness can catch us off guard and hurt us again.In one of my favorite stories in the collection, “The Survivors,” the protagonist moves quickly from subject to subject, talking about her relationship with her best friend, her favorite authors, her depression, her sedatives, then about how she now knows how to properly masturbate—it’s all good—then back to her time in a psychiatric hospital. In the title story, “Moldy Strawberries,” a suicidal, recovering drug addict makes fun of his doctor’s recommendations but follows his orders anyway. In many ways, the characters’ wit and lightness serve as a reference point for assessing the depth of the darkness found in these stories. But they also show that despite everything, these characters are still alive and full of joy. At the end of “Moldy Strawberries,” the narrator stands on top of an overpass and stares at the flowerless flowerbeds down below. “Would it be possible to grow strawberries here?” he asks, by which he means, “Is it be possible to find joy and beauty in a world like ours?” For Abreu, the answer is always yes.Read fiction by Caio Fernando Abreu, translated by Bruna Dantas Lobato Charlotte Whittle on Jorge Comensal’s Profane ParrotIn Jorge Comensal’s The Mutations (forthcoming from FSG, November 2019), a Mexico City lawyer is stricken with cancer of the tongue: cellular mutations, pathology reports, a glossectomy, chemotherapy. . . sounds hilarious, right? Enter Benito, a bedraggled parrot gifted to the patient as a consolation for the loss of his tongue. Though Benito is from the jungle, he curses like a Mexico City native: “¡Cabrón!” and “¡No mames!” are some of his signature squawks. Translating curses is a tricky business, especially when they come from the mouth of a parrot. The question arises: is it most important to preserve the image evoked by the original phrase, or to find an alternative that occupies the same approximate role in the target language? Cabrón could be translated directly as “bastard” or “asshole,” but can also express praise and admiration. Perhaps, then, “motherfucker” was a candidate? I spent a long time watching videos of Samuel L. Jackson demonstrating the glorious flexibility of that word. But, for reasons that become apparent in the extraordinary final scene of The Mutations, I needed a term that could also be brought into play as a profane echo of “Lamb of God.” “Son of a bitch” offered an echo at least in structure, and delightfully profane implications when applied to the Holy Family. And what of “¡No mames!”—that quintessentially Mexican expression of surprise or disbelief? Though it may not occupy the same semantic field, the English “What the fuck?!” seemed to capture Benito’s reactions to his friend and confidant perfectly.So, the protagonist’s first dialogue with the parrot goes like this: The parrot was intrigued by this human who, unlike all the others it had met, didn’t overwhelm it with noise and gestures. There was something comforting about his discreet gaze and total silence. Gradually, it began to relax in the patio, surrounded by bushes and flower pots. Once it had grown used to Ramón’s presence, it demonstrated its cheerfulness with one of the phrases it knew.“Son of a bitch!” it squawked in a shrill and nasal voice. “Son of a bitch!”Ramón let out his first guffaw since the tumor had appeared on the scene. The mutant sound that emerged from his lips was more like a sea lion’s territorial bark than a human expression of delight.“What the fuck?!” answered the parrot.Ramón roared with laughter. The parrot reiterated its surprise at its companion’s unexpected reaction.“What the fuck?!”I’d be lying if I said I didn’t also fall down a rabbit hole (one I absolutely don’t regret) of watching videos of swearing parrots. From the deadpan to the jubilant, I have become an expert in the cursing birds of the Internet. I think Benito would approve.   Edward Gauvin on Satire and Swearing in Graphic LiteratureBecause I translate a lot of comics, I get a lot of questions about translating humor. I’m grateful to my medium of predilection for letting me tackle a variety of genres that don’t often make it over here, at least not from France: biography, popular science, epic fantasy, crime, science fiction, and, recently, documentary reportage. But humor is a small slice of what I do; Sunday funnies aren’t a thing in French. Then again, satirical weeklies aren’t a thing in English, though thanks to Ros Schwartz, I was part of a crack team translating a short-lived digital version of Charlie Hebdo. There, the task was as much to pack in cultural reference as to craft a snappy caption. If brevity is the soul of wit, and wit the epitaph of emotion, then too often translations are weathered headstones. Here lies a joke; it died of explanation.Most of the funny pages I’ve done, from Abel Lanzac and Christophe Blain’s Weapons of Mass Diplomacy to Gébé’s Letter to Survivors, have eschewed gut-busting for satirical barbs. By far, my bugbear in comics is, instead, translating profanity, which is all about emphatic equivalencies and seldom remotely literal. Just whose name is being minced in vain when the character’s . . . a pagan? A paladin? An alien? In the Loop and David Simon’s Twitter account set gold standards for swearing, but their invective is often so inventive it can’t be torn from context.And establishing context—setting tone and voice, priming readers’ expectations—is something translating humor shares with translating just about anything. Punch lines hog the limelight, like trouvailles in translation, nuggets of linguistic brilliance often justly trucked out to validate our craft. But what’s a bit without a build? That elastic atmosphere of likely laughter lets the joke explode.Read Abel Lanzac and Christophe Blain’s Weapons of Mass Diplomacy and Gébé’s Letter to Survivors, translated by Edward Gauvin Emma Ramadan on Fouad Laroui’s Absurd ScenariosFouad Laroui is really, really good with plays on words, and his book of short stories, The Curious Case of Dassoukine’s Trousers, is full of them. Translating that sort of thing is always quite difficult, especially when it’s necessary for the punch line of a joke. In his story “Bennani’s Bodyguard,” Laroui misspells the French word for “bodyguard” (guard du corps) throughout the story—gardkor, gardicor, etc.—to reflect and poke fun at the accent of Moroccans speaking French. This play with accents and dialects that works so well in French didn’t seem to in English, so I ended up dropping some of it.But overall, the humorous story arcs present in Laroui’s book translate into English. One story revolves around a swimming exam that has to take place in sand or on grass at certain Moroccan schools that don’t have swimming pools—the students are thus caught off guard by the new exam requirements that have just been passed down from on high. That scenario is just as ridiculous in English as in French. In “Born Nowhere,” Laroui pokes fun at Morocco’s bureaucratic systems by unraveling the story of an uncle who goes to extreme lengths to ensure his nephew can vote for him in an election twenty-one years later. In the title story, featured in the January issue of Words Without Borders, our protagonist, Dassoukine, has to cross a major city square in his pajamas after a thief steals his only pair of pants. He buys a ghastly pair of colorful golf trousers to wear to an important meeting at which he is to negotiate the price of twenty million pounds of wheat. He makes out with the product for next to nothing because his appearance has the committee convinced he’s a “desperate case.”The situations are absurd but also believable because of the systems in place in countries like Morocco, and therein lies the humor, which I think translates. One thing about Fouad’s humor is that it requires a certain understanding of the world, of what life might be like in other countries. But I think your average reader of short stories in translation is someone familiar with, or at least interested in, other countries and cultures—someone with an open mind and the ability to imagine.Read Fouad Laroui’s “The Curious Case of Dassoukine’s Trousers,” translated by Emma Ramadan Hillary Gulley on Yoss’s Latinate Laughs The humor in Yoss’s “Interstellar Biochocolate Mousse à la Solitaire . . . For Two” is both situational and linguistic. On the one hand, it’s a recipe set in the future, intended for interstellar travelers who might not know what milk is, or that it comes from mammals like cows. On the other, it refers to ingredients—both familiar and futuristic—by their Latin names. For example, the recipe calls for milk from a cow (bos taurus) and warns against using milk from the dragonturkey of Colimán IV (dracubirdius horribilis).While the translation of these aspects was surprisingly straightforward, there was the added layer of the recipe’s detached, didactic tone. Latinate words, which evoke the didactic in English, underlie the entire Spanish language, so their near-exclusive use in the original is inevitable—and not necessarily funny. But in English, the Latinate lexicon has a different role: it’s the domain of the institutional, the learned, and the guarded, and can be heavy and pedantic in a way that its cognates are not in Spanish. The same qualities, however, make it an ideal candidate for mockery.When I translate from the Romance languages, I tend to avoid longer English words from Latin in favor of their shorter, punchier equivalents from Old English. But in this case, I knew I could heighten the piece’s ironic tone by using more Latinate words (studies have “determined” and not “shown,” milk is “produced” and not “made”). The challenge was to pepper the English prose with enough of these words to create the desired effect while still preserving the piece’s light, idiomatic feel. But after all my efforts, the ultimate irony may be that in Yoss’s vision of the future, cows are almost extinct and milk comes from dragonturkeys, while Latin has somehow managed to thrive in deep space.Read Yoss’s “Intersteller Biochocolate Mousse à la Solitaire . . . For Two,” translated by Hillary Gulley  Jeremy Tiang on Lawrence Lei’s Linguistic SlapstickFor a small island, Macau contains a lot of languages: along with Portuguese and English, the locals speak Cantonese and (sometimes) the Macanese patois, with neighboring China providing an influx of Mandarin. A story I translated for the Macau Literature Festival, “Wolf Hunt” by Lawrence Lei, exploited this linguistic fluidity to create a great comic climax.The story follows a motley group of people fed up with their dead-end jobs who decide to carry out a kidnapping to make some quick cash. Unsurprisingly, they are hilariously inept at this, not least because their getaway driver is from Mainland China and doesn’t understand Cantonese, so everyone else can only speak to her in their appalling Mandarin.The story ends with a standoff: a hit man has come after their victim and is prepared to wipe out the kidnappers to get at him. The driver manages to pull a gun on the hit man—and at the same moment, a dropped cigarette sets a pile of newspapers alight. One of the gang screams at another to open a window (“kai chuang”) to clear the smoke, but mispronounces a crucial word and instead says “kai qiang”—“shoot.” So everyone with a gun pulls the trigger . . .Call it translator’s luck, but English provided an elegant, more straightforward solution: the single word “fire!” shouted at the sight of the flames is enough to set off the gun battle. Rather than try to explain the mispronunciation, I simply had the flustered gang member lose the ability to put a sentence together in Mandarin, so all he can shout is that one word, over and over.Bang. John K. Cox on Ajla Terzić’s Comical Imagery In the text “Tito and Taxidermy, or What If Tito Had Been on Twitter,” which Words Without Borders published, I was struck once again by Ajla Terzić’s incredible powers of observation. These powers come through in all her work, and if you hang out with her in person, they’re almost supernatural. It’s a real gift, I believe. Anyway, in this especially breathless and generally humorous essay of hers, she makes a lot of thumbnail characterizations of famous people, as well as of certain emblematic consumer products, quintessentially Yugoslav organizations, etc. When I first read her line about the “cat-eyed Elizabeth Taylor and a Richard Burton who’s sunburned to a crisp,” I dashed off to Google to look at photos of those stars from those years. Ajla was right, of course, and I’ve never been able to shake those images or her words. After a good laugh, I realized she works the same magic with all kinds of other things in that little story, from a goofy sex toy to a donkey ride at a county fair to Tito’s memory as a “phantom limb.” These images hit a remarkably high level of emotional truthfulness by combining both accuracy and humor.Read Ajla Terzić’s “Tito and Taxidermy, or What If Tito Had Been on Twitter,” translated by John K. Cox Margaret Carson on Remedios Varo’s Absurdist HumorBefore I began translating Remedios Varo’s Letters, Dreams and Other Writings, I knew she had a strong comic streak—for example, in her masterpiece Mimetismo [Mimicry], a woman sitting in an armchair begins to blend in with it, like a moth mimicking a tree—but I had little idea of the comic brilliance I’d discover in her writings, especially in her letters. Forget about news and gossip: these letters are comedy sketches, pure and simple. They’re amusing not because of their ingenious punch lines or clever wordplay or culturally-specific jokes. The humor is in the weird scenarios and improbable elements, such as a house with a small volcano rising in its courtyard that’s “admirable at preparing shish kebabs and brochettes to perfection” and whose lava can be applied to the scalp. It’s an absurdist humor in which things like a woman’s shoe of pearl-embroidered, violet velvet or a dried hummingbird stuffed with magnetic dust have an unusually consequential role. The beauty of my job as the translator was to simply render Varo’s words into English in the same straight-faced tone, asking myself, “Is this amusing in English?” ”Is it deadpan enough?” “Too over-the-top?” There was one instance when I did add some flourish to the original: in a letter to an old friend Varo waxes nostalgic about “las antiguas paellas”—the former paellas, the paellas of old—which I couldn’t help but translate as “the paellas of yesteryear,” smiling all the way. Michele Hutchison on Tosca Menten’s Creative CursingHumor can come in many different forms which pose different translation problems. Timing is often crucial, but that’s not so much of an issue as long as you think about the syntax beforehand so that the funny word comes at the end of the line where it belongs. A play on words is more of a challenge because you often have to move away from the original while keeping the association credible. Creative cursing can also be fun to translate, which was something I particularly enjoyed in the novels of Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer. While translating the children’s novel Dummie the Mummy and the Golden Scarab by Dutch author Tosca Menten, I got to reinvent some fake swear words that might appeal to young readers:“Nick rarely got angry, only at his paintings. He swore at them and said things like, ‘Ugly cottypot!’ It was a swear word he had invented because Angus and his father did not allow swearing in the house. He had also invented ‘Whumpy dumpman’ and he used that for all other things.” Mui Poopoksakul on Prabda Yoon’s Humorous NicknamesPrabda Yoon’s The Sad Part Was and Moving Parts both have a lot of tee-hee moments where the author makes jokes playing off a word or a name. Trying to replicate his move with names proved particularly difficult because naming practices in Thailand and in English-speaking countries are different. Thai nicknames are often simple, everyday words, and you can choose just about anything; for example, it’s completely normal to name your kid Apple or Orange or Duck or Chicken, so writers have more options at their disposal when setting up a joke. Translating humor linked to a name presents two issues. First, to keep the joke, you’ll probably have to turn the name into an English name, which isn’t ideal. Second, your possibilities as to what passes as a name are much more limited. In a story in Moving Parts, a boy has a nightmare about being pinched by a crab (“pooh” in Thai). Then soon after he wakes up, we meet a character whose name in the original is Jah. The word “jah” in Thai is a particle so it doesn’t have much meaning, but there’s a Thai crab dish called pooh jah, so I had to try to come up with a recognizable crab dish that contains a person’s name in its name. In the end, I went with Crab Louie, although it’s maybe more retro than I would have liked.Read fiction by Prabda Yoon, translated by Mui Poopoksakul Owen Good on Réka Mán-Várhegyi’s Fantastical FarceHumour in Translation 101, or:Authorized AssaultTuesday, 11:00 a.m., a seminar room in Budapest. We’re about to discuss possible translations of a violent and absurd encounter. In one of Réka Mán-Várhegyi’s short stories, “The Age of Aquarius,” our hero Magdi, after a few productive hours of translation work at home, overloads on greasy scrambled eggs, a very milky coffee, and a quantity of chocolate cookies. Magdi presently passes out in bed fully dressed. She wakes up groggy in the unfriendly dark of the evening. It happens.Swiftly en route to the bar, maybe grouchy from fatigue, certainly holding hard feelings toward her ex-boyfriend, Magdi plays out a fantasy where she spots her unsuspecting ex on the street and presently nekifutásból fejeli le . . .“She gives him a diving head-butt,” chimes in a brave student. I put it on the board.Any more? What else have we got?“She floors him.”“She torpedoes him.”“She gives him a Glasgow kiss?”On the board.She dropkicks him, she roundhouses him, she spears him, she nuts him one, she clotheslines him.We pause to catch our breaths and reflect. We’re having a lot of fun. The ex-boyfriend meanwhile has had better days and is crawling for the door, when from the back row:“She Zidane’s him!”When we look at the full board, we agree the first suggestion is the closest. But we can’t agree if it’s the best. We become film directors: First we get the best out of the English actors we have. Afterward we select the take that draws the best reaction, while still following logically. In our heads, we play back synonyms as Magdi launches, leaps, and dives across the street toward an unsuspecting ex.Read Réka Mán-Várhegyi’s fiction, translated by Owen Good Peter Bush on Teresa Solana’s Comical CannibalsWhen names are comic, and the context is appropriate, I’m all for translating them. But how? I faced such a challenge when working on Teresa Solana’s surreal tale of the first sleuth in history in “The First Prehistoric Serial Killer.” The Hairy Bear tribe is experiencing murder after murder, and in the Catalan original these troglodytes are named after medieval Catalan nobles and other historic figures: Pere, Berenguer, Guifré, Odalric, Humfrid, Martí . . . All key figures in those halcyon days when Barcelona ruled the roost in the Mediterranean. A rival set of Neanderthals is based in Poblet, otherwise renowned for its beautiful medieval monastery. Not exactly household names in the US or UK! I should mention that the story is shot through with other anachronisms—the sleuth is familiar with Sherlock and Sigmund, among others. In a first version, I opted for contemporary aristos—Philip, Charles, Harry, Elizabeth, James // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

    News & Media > News from Abroad

  • An Interview with Sang Young Park

    By Anton HurSang Young ParkThe title story of Sang Young Park’s debut collection, Tears of an Unknown Artist, or Zaytun Pasta (Munhakdongne, 2018), is serialized in Words Without Borders in Anton Hur’s translation.  Sang Young Park, now in his early thirties, was born in Daegu, a city in southeastern Korea, where redevelopment has rendered his childhood neighborhood completely unrecognizable. He attended college and graduate school in Seoul, where he earned degrees in French, journalism, and creative writing, and where he worked in various day jobs before recently quitting to write full time and teach at the Seoul Institute of the Arts.In person, Park is solid, bright, and handsome, and he speaks without a trace of a Daegu accent (his mother is from Seoul). Unusually for a Korean man, he also sports a beard. We met a few times to discuss his work but I got so carried away by our conversation that I forgot to record an interview. Consequently, the following interview was conducted over email. Anton Hur (AH): So how did you get the idea to write a story about a Korean gay romance and friendship set in Iraq during the war?Sang Young Park (SYP): The Zaytun Division and Korea’s participation in the Iraq War was something I always had in my arsenal to write about. There’s a complicated story behind it that I’m sure not everyone is interested in—feel free to scroll!I lived in New York City for a year in 2007 and happened to go by Ground Zero one day. I hadn’t planned to go there—I was actually on my way to a nearby Century 21 outlet to buy a bag. The whole block was under construction and it was all steel fences and detour signs. I wasn’t paying much attention because my energy was concentrated on shopping and I was going up the steel-grate steps toward retail glory.At the top of the flight, which was almost two stories tall, I saw a huge and very deep pit over the construction fence below. There was also a sign there, standing like a monument, proclaiming this was Ground Zero. It felt weird to see such a sign amidst my determination to buy some bag at an off-season discount. I couldn’t stay there long, because you had to make it in early for the good stuff, but I felt like a pit had formed in the back of my mind. I thought, I would like to write about that pit someday.The second inspiration for this story had to do with an art piece. Like other pretentiously artsy young people, I love going to art galleries. I never miss a Seoul Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art exhibition on the annual Today’s Artists Award. At the 2015 edition, I was watching Oh Inhwan’s “Looking for the Blind Spot” installation with particular interest. The screens on the wall were showing interviews with military conscripts who had looked for blind spots around their postings where they could masturbate. I was obviously watching this with great concentration when a familiar face appeared on the screen, an upperclassman I knew but hadn’t kept in contact with. Normally he was a man of frustratingly few words, but his slow and monotonous voice in the video was actually very evocative of the desert in Iraq where he had served. I didn’t have much of a choice—I called him up and we had pork bossam wraps at a place near Anguk Station and I got him to talk about the Zaytun Division, Korea’s troop deployment in Iraq during the war. He gave me precious firsthand content on Erbil and a subdivision in charge of drawing murals for public spaces. I kept thinking, this is so great, this would make good fiction, and I jotted down notes with his permission. I bought the bossam that day.Since I had invested time, effort, and money in the story, I thought that I would write it as a full-length novel, once I developed better chops as a novelist. But I ended up writing this short story in 2017, my debut year as a novelist, because of the Captain A Incident (a witch hunt of gay conscripts carried out by a homophobic officer).In all the noise of the controversy surrounding the Incident, I began thinking that I needed my own interpretation of the event. And so, two springs ago, I decided I should write about two men who end up fooling around in the middle of a war zone. I didn’t have as much time as I thought I would to prepare, so I ended up rushing through it. The commission I had received from a magazine was also for a short story, not a novella, which is what the story became. I think I just had too much accumulated inside me and I had to let it all out, which then made me pressed for time. I couldn’t see where the story was going, which made me suffer the whole time I was writing it. Even now, after it’s been published and the reviews have been good, I still think of it with shame and despair because I did not take “Zaytun Pasta” as far as I’d hoped it could go.I guess it’s not that obvious how my story connects to the Captain A Incident. But still, when I read it now, I’m reminded of how I felt I needed to work this out for myself more than anyone else. Because that was how I felt after I finished. I’m really grateful to this story. AH: As a translator, I’m always curious about how writers develop their style. Your usage of postpositions is very precise and leaves no room for foggy ambiguity, and while translating it I kept thinking that you have a very Anglo-Saxon sense of prose. How did you develop your style? What books, education, and epiphanies went into it?SYP: My favorite writers as a kid were Agatha Christie and J. K. Rowling. I’ve read all of the approximately eighty Agatha Christie books that have been translated into Korean. I used to collect them when I was in elementary school. I also spent my teenage years with Harry Potter. You could say those two authors were my literary foundation growing up.If I were to think about it more, maybe I had an Anglo-Saxonish education. My mom was a teacher and she had me read Disney books in English as a child—My favorite was a warm fairy tale entitled Button Soup—and I learned alphabet phonics along with Korean hangul. We had all the Disney movies at home and I watched one every day, Peter Pan the most. My dad loved English pop songs so I grew up listening to Whitney Houston, Stevie Wonder, Mariah Carey, and Sarah Brightman more than any Korean artist. In high school I was in the English theater club and wrote plays. I was active in extracurriculars, unlike most kids who were more focused on the college entrance exams, and I was into things like studying the French baccalaureate philosophy questions and generally having a well-rounded high school experience that, compared to most Korean kids, was closer to the model they have in the States or the UK, which trained me in terms of critical thinking.In terms of prose style, I wasn’t really conscious of influences from English literature. Someone did comment during a workshop that my style reminded them of Chuck Palahniuk or David Sedaris, and so when I read their work, I thought, Perhaps they had a similar sentiment and perspective as I did? It could just be my own ego talking. Korean literature tends to allow you to take a lot of poetic license and to use a loose and ambiguous sentence style that stands in for emotional expression, whereas I tend to go for a logically coherent, direct, and concise style. Maybe that reads a bit Anglo-Saxon. I like to capture the most detailed emotions that others may easily overlook, insignificant things that I might feel in very ordinary moments.AH: Could you describe your creative process? How do you choose your material, get inspired, and do the writing?SYP: I jot down notes about funny scenes or hilarious stuff my friends say in real life. I have a lot of weird friends whose heads aren’t quite screwed on right. They’re terrible drinkers and even worse at life. And they’re my muses. Once I have enough incidents and one-liners, I can set up an outline and begin writing. Sometimes it’s social issues or the news that inspires me. The spark is different for every story. “Zaytun Pasta,” as you’ve seen, took a few different sparks.The process itself is very simple. I get commissioned by a literary magazine to write a story, I select an episode from my notes that seems right for the amount of manuscript pages of that commission, and I try my best to keep to the deadline. Normally I wake up at dawn to write, drinking lots of coffee on an otherwise empty stomach, which gives me constant ulcers. Once the story is completed, I’m happy for about two days before I sink into the meaninglessness of the daily grind, trying to put together a new story. I think I’m trapped in the net of fiction. AH: There are many moments reading your work where I marvel at how satisfyingly you manage to turn minor experiences, which I thought were too obscure to express, into literature. How did you think to put down these experiences, feelings, time, and space into words?SYP: I’ve had a great desire to express myself since I was little. In my neighborhood growing up, I was always called “the child who talks like an adult” or “the kid with the loud mouth.” A child that acts older than his peers is bound to be lonely. I began writing when I really began to wish that someone would understand the emotions or the unbearableness I was feeling in the moment. That’s why I like to capture the most detailed emotions that others may easily overlook, insignificant things that I might feel in very ordinary moments. That actually may be why I became a writer and why I write. I really want to use that “unbearableness” as an energy to imbue the insignificant aspects of the ordinary with power in my work. AH: It’s common practice in Korean publishing to debut an author through a short-story collection rather than a novel, but reading your works gives me the impression that you prefer long form. How do you feel about novels vs. short stories?SYP: In Korea, a writer usually debuts through one of the big short-story contests before being commissioned to write full-length novels. I also had to write short stories in order to find a publisher to publish my work, and I was lucky to win a big competition hosted by a major publisher, but I’ve always wanted to write long narratives like novels. Most of the time I write two to three times more than my allotted number of words whenever I’m commissioned for a short story, which means I have to cut a lot, and that often makes me feel the Korean writing market just isn’t a good fit for me. That’s why I write a lot of novellas and why about half the pages of my book are of some novella or other. My second book will be a novel, and I have a few more novels already planned out after that. I’m a believer in the power of sheer narrative. AH: You don’t use quotation marks in your dialogue. Despite this, I have no problem figuring out who is saying what, and the whole feeling is like that of a fragment of unified memory, not one of a scene being played out before me like in a movie. Is there a particular reason you’re not using quotation marks?SYP: The narrator’s voice is colloquial so I wanted the divide between narration and dialogue to blur. Maybe I wanted the reader to immerse themselves more in the narrator’s storytelling? I wanted them to read quickly and I thought quotation marks would slow them down. Although I have no idea if I achieved that. AH: I saw your friend “Wangsha” pop up on your Instagram recently, and I understand he’s the person who inspired the name for your character. Is the real Wangsha very different from the one in your story or did you just use his name? Is there a reason you use the names of the people around you? How do they feel about their names appearing in your work?SYP: I like to use the physical attributes, accents, drinking habits, and nicknames of my acquaintances in my stories. That helps me immerse myself more in the story, and the details of the characters come to life. Of course, the characters are nowhere near the same as the people in real life, and my characters are completely new combinations and creations. My friends love attention, so they love it when I use their names or nicknames in my work. They even brag about it. They’re like the mean girls in Mean Girls, and it’s really thanks to them that I have my writing career. I got to meet a diversity of people from different classes and sectors . . . Perhaps this variety itself is the source of my narratives and is what sets me apart.AH: You’ve started a column in Hankyeoreh Daily, and I really liked the first installment about going to work in an office. The Shirley Jackson Award-winner Pyun Hye-young, when asked a weird question about what distinguished her from another famous suspense writer, answered that the fact that she had been an office worker made her different from him. Writers from Yeonsu Kim to Toni Morrison have certain ideas about the relationship between day jobs and writing. What do you think was the influence of your own job on your work? SYP: I had a huge desire to write when I was in my early twenties but I had no experience to work from and that was frustrating. I recently quit full-time office work to write my novel, but throughout my twenties I worked at all sorts of offices and managed to gather a variety of episodes and characters to use later on. For the past six years, I’ve worked at an ad agency, as a manager at a college dormitory, as a management consultant, as a reporter at a culture magazine, and as a buyer at a start-up promotion center. I got to meet a diversity of people from different classes and sectors, and thanks to this, my head is full of good writing material. Perhaps this variety itself is the source of my narratives and is what sets me apart from writers who are more known for being beautiful stylists or for writing about things like the secret cracks forming inside the fragile shell of the self.But the thing about those jobs is that you just have no time to write. I was at a nine-to-six full-time job while I was completing my first short-story collection and I had to sleep a lot less because of this. I don’t think I’ve slept more than five hours these past two years since my debut. My health is at a low ebb and I’ve gained 45 pounds, which is why I’ve quit my job and am building up my strength before writing my next novel. AH: Have you thought of writing nonfiction other than your column, or perhaps even movie scripts or other genres?SYP: I like essays, and the column right now is a prelude to a book of essays. The title of the column is “I Better Not Eat Before Bed Tonight” and it’s about the tragedy of an overweight writer who is juggling a full-time job. I’m interested in visual narrative mediums. Like any other writer, I watch Netflix like a maniac. Especially sitcoms. Recently I was into Sex Education, Pose, One Day at a Time, and Russian Doll. I watch all the Cannes and Berlin film festival laureates. I like documentaries, too. I have a friend who studied film, and he said I watched more films than most film students. Incidentally, he reads more literature than I do.Oh, and that very friend told me there was a film director who made movies that were really similar to my writing, so I watched a couple on my own and ended up bawling my eyes out. They were Sean Baker’s Tangerine and The Florida Project. Tangerine is a masterpiece that shows exactly what I wanted to show with my short story “Knockoff Chinese Viagra and Jeje, a Short Joke on Piss that Doesn’t Pool Anywhere,” and the last scene of The Florida Project made me do the ugly cry. I think that Mr. Baker is a man who really knows what life is all about. I can’t wait for his next movie.I’m all for commissions coming from other genres. I’ve actually won a prize in a web drama screenwriting competition run by the Korea Creative Content Agency. I signed a contract with them and got paid and everything, but the project fizzled in pre-production. I’m still sad about that. I don’t really think of my work being turned into movies when I write but I’m more than open to the idea, and I’m always ready to delve into whatever form of writing that will take. AH: Your next book is going to be a novel. How is that going, what’s it about, and when is it coming out?SYP: I’ve actually just finished writing it. It’s what we call an “omnibus novel” in Korea, where a set of short stories are loosely connected to each other to form a larger narrative. You know, like The Vegetarian. I’m trimming away at the four large chapters that create a complete picture at the very end.As to what it’s about . . . if I may be a bit pretentious here again, the key words would basically be queers and Catholicism, women, abortion, STDs, and economic class. I guess it’s about the emptiness that anyone living in a big city these days feels in their everyday lives, written in a very detailed and funny string of love stories. I’m calling it How to Love in the Big City for now, after one of the chapters. I may change the title to Late Rainy Season Vacation. We’re going to try to put it out this summer. I hope you enjoy it! Translated by Anton Hur. Sang Young Park was born in Daegu in 1988. He studied French and journalism at Sungkyunkwan University and attended the creative writing master's program at Dongguk University. He began his career by winning the 2016 Munhakdongne New Writers Award for "Searching for Paris Hilton" and he published his short story collection The Tears of an Unknown Artist, or Zaytun Pasta in 2018.Published Apr 10, 2019   Copyright 2019 Anton HurReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

    News & Media > News from Abroad

  • Starting at the Surface: An Interview with Lee Hyemi

    By So J. LeeLee HyemiSo J. Lee’s translation of Lee Hyemi’s “The Cupboard with Strawberry Jam” from Unexpected Vanilla appears in this month’s Queer issue. After a year of emailing back and forth, the two met in person for the first time in Mangwon-dong on May 11 and talked about Surrealism, stereotypes about Korea, making up words, speaking out against sexual violence, and becoming a “grandma author.” This interview was conducted in Korean and has been condensed and translated by So J. Lee. So J. Lee: There are a number of images or words that I associate with you, so I thought I’d start this interview with a game of word association. For example, you can say what word comes to mind when I say “eyelash.” Lee Hyemi: Gaze.SJL: Water surface (Homonym of “sleep” in Korean).LHM: Pillow?SJL: Oh, water surface. LHM: Water pillow? [laughs]SJL: The twinkle in one’s eyes.LHM: Sign.    SJL: Mark. LHM: Magnolia.SJL: Finger. LHM: Scratch.SJL: Swaying.LHM: Aurora.SJL: Shining.LHM: Palette.SJL: Flipping. LHM: Mud.SJL: Runny.LHM: Lips.SJL: Fading. LHM: Footprints.SJL: I wanted to try this since your poems remind me of Surrealist paintings. I notice one or two details before I come to understand the whole, and even then I don’t “understand” it neatly or logically. I feel like I had a dream. So when I read them in Korean, I simply read them, and it’s when I translate them into English that I think, “Wait, what? This doesn’t actually make sense!” Is there any word you want to explain further? LHM: There’s definitely a list of words that I use often in my poetry. I want to use a variety of words, so I try to avoid that list as much as I can. Yet there’s still so many. I feel like I’ve been caught. [laughs] I didn’t realize “flipping” appeared so often.SJL: I think you use it in different ways. In “No Panties” the flowers’ skirts are flipped, and in “Diver” the ocean is flipped. Because you’re an avid scuba diver, I was surprised that you use the word “water surface” more often than “submersion.” Is there a reason?LHM: I think I prefer the sound of “water surface” (sumyeon) over “submersion” (jamsu). Plus, submersion is the state of already having gone down and seen something, already having found out. Water surface, then, is the state of not knowing yet? Possibility, maybe. There’s more room for imagination. Maybe I like not knowing more than having found out.We say we sink into sleep. We sink into water. We sink into thought. I think all this sinking is related to falling, whether we fall into or for something. The water surface contains the wait of the world before we fall in. To sink into something, you have to start at the surface.SJL: Interestingly, your poems often feature bodies, but it’s less like the speaker talking about their own body and more like someone else’s finger, footprints, or some other body part appearing. LHM: I think you’re right. I like to focus not on the word itself but on its periphery, so that the reader can think of the word on their own. Thinking about eyes, I write about eyebrows. I want to talk about love without talking about love. I want to talk about sadness without using the word “sadness.”SJL: As you know, Surrealism started as an artistic movement to resist fascism, but male artists received much more attention than female artists and treated women as sexual muses. So I appreciate the way that you, as a female artist, resist the machismo of Surrealism. LHM: The pivot of all “isms” is men, or power—while poetry and the language of minorities attempt to overcome the violence of those isms. Even without a “female” label, I think it’s necessary to destroy and break through all sorts of isms.SJL: Your poems have been published in a variety of English-language journals over the past year, and I’ve introduced Unexpected Vanilla as “subverting the vanilla norm without denying its pleasures.” I find it amusing that BDSM is considered unusual in the society we currently live in, yet the opposite, “vanilla,” is what’s unexpected in the world of your collection. Would you like to explain the title?LHM: I like imagining what we now take for granted becoming totally antiquated or disappearing in the future. “In the past they used to go to a place called school,” or “Women used to get pregnant and give birth. How barbaric,” or “They used to cook their own food.” What we used to never question is already changing, you know? Even now in Korea, there aren’t that many families that make their own kimchi or gochujang or soy sauce, and people don’t have memories of their grandmothers making sikhye anymore. Considering something to be “obvious” and using that as an absolute standard is itself an excessively conservative way of thinking. Isn’t it good for the parameters of normalcy, what is considered obvious, what is “vanilla,” to later become totally unreasonable and unimaginable?Aside from that, the image of vanilla ice cream. Sweet, melting, dripping, smearing. I picked it because I like how it’s both sticky and hard.SJL: I think it fits perfectly. As I said in Asymptote last month, I read this collection because I was drawn by the unique title. I saw the word “vanilla” and read on thinking, “No way . . . ” but then I was pleasantly surprised to find a poem called “Femdom.” Including your first collection Ultraviolet, your titles suggest a deviation from the standard or norm. What do you think? LHM: Through translation I learned that both titles have the sense of being “outside” something. I want to face outward, try to see what’s invisible, and keep rejecting what’s considered obvious or saying that there’s another way. In the case of Ultraviolet, I was very interested in colors for a while. The wavelengths of light, ultraviolet rays, infrared rays, the visible spectrum, etc.UV rays are interesting. For example, there’s this plain white flower with an incredibly colorful pattern that appears when you take a picture with a UV camera. The pattern on the flower is called a runway. It's a target of sorts, with arrows saying, “Here is the honey.” Bees and butterflies see this runway and go to the flower, but the pattern is invisible to our eyes. The cover of Ultraviolet has a butterfly—a creature that can see beyond violet. I wanted to express the meanings of not only what we can see, but what we cannot see.SJL: You debuted in English through Modern Poetry in Translation’s focus on LBGTQ+ poetry, and now you’re in the Words Without Borders Queer Issue X. I was nervous emailing you for the first time [about the issue] and thrilled that you greeted me so warmly. How do you feel about you or your works being read in a queer context? LHM: Honestly, I do think that it’s simplistic for people to be packaged and consumed only by their sexual identity. I mean, identity is so very complex and personal. And it can change over time. I wrote these poems to capture that confusion. It’d be nice if readers can identify and empathize with the situation or emotion I’ve presented in a poem.SJL: That sounds ideal. But it seems like a complicated issue because it’s also important to take pride [in your identity] when you speak up as a minority. In Korea these days, there are more works about queerness and openly queer authors. Then again, I think being an open secret is such a Korean queer thing . . .LHM: Our society is certainly rigid. People are quick to clutch their pearls and make a big deal out of such things. What about it! I mean, if you’re not going to date me, mind your own business. [laughs] I think it's a bit violent to pry into someone's identity like that.I've written many poems with sexual nuances, and it’s true that I was very interested in that. Human desires, just how far people go. “Femdom” features a kind of role-play that allows for the experience of dominance and subjugation, which creates sexual tension. It's a sexual relationship as well as a political practice. I also wonder, “Do I feel sexual desire only after checking where I am in relation to my partner?”SJL: The funny thing is, you keep talking in the past tense. LHM: There was a time when I was too obsessed with that sort of thing.SJL: Are you announcing that you’re not anymore?LHM: Now I’m into other things . . . I’m really interested in plants these days. Have I become too mild? [laughs] When I find a new interest, I tend to fall hard. I research, find illustrations.SJL: I think you’re quite bold for writing poems like “The Cupboard with Strawberry Jam” and “Femdom,” but that aspect isn’t addressed in any of the criticism. I find that really curious. LHM: Why don’t they [address it]?SJL: That’s my question! Why do you think [they don’t]?LHM: I think the reviews of my first book tended to lump everything into "love.” I got the sense that they knew but avoided it in the way you say "making love" to avoid saying "sex." The word “love” is too massive and ambiguous. It includes friendship and sexual intercourse and thought.I suppose some parts may be uncomfortable to address in literary criticism. Sex is still a subject that’s not serious or dignified enough and difficult to discuss. Maybe it’s difficult to address without devoting an entire chapter to it.That's what the “average” person is most afraid of: that they’ll become unexpected.SJL: To think about it another way, I wonder if queerness or kink just goes over people's heads in a heteronormative society. When the film The Handmaiden came out, there were people reading the lesbian romance as “sisterly love," or really trying not to see what’s in front of them. LHM: Trying to cover it up. That's what the “average” person is most afraid of: that they’ll become unexpected. So they turn their backs, pretend like something doesn’t exist, and try to fit everything into the norm somehow.SJL: When I first started translating your work, someone said your work isn’t “Korean enough” to translate.LHM: [imitating air quotes] Not “Korean enough”?SJL: As in, non-Korean readers want something “exotic,” but Unexpected Vanilla isn’t that and so won’t succeed.LHM: Orientalism?SJL: Yes. We can laugh at it now, but I did want to discuss this in person. It’s true that many young writers, not just you, are told by Korean literary critics that their works lack a traditional sensibility. What do you think about that?LHM: First, let me go change into a hanbok dress. [laughs] I have to do some fan dancing as well. I suppose we should consider what Korea’s unique characteristics are, rather than stereotypes or what’s understood as “Korean” by the world. That said, my poems contain a number of Korean elements. “Under the Fluttering Red and White Flags” features Korean shamanism. There are poetic aspects to Korean superstitions, like “If you burn a raw tree, your neighbor dies” or “You shouldn't write in red ink.”SJL: That poem about shamanistic flags is truly plenty “Korean.” [laughs] But it’s not like you have to do that. Despite the criticism of “not being Korean enough,” you also majored in Korean literature as an undergraduate and just finished your doctoral courses. LHM: Actually, the reason I majored in Korean literature in the first place is—I thought that if I got my MA and PhD in Korean literature as a native speaker, I could reach the pinnacle of Korean . . . but how misguided I was! Even though I can’t go higher, I’ve gone deeper. There aren’t too many opportunities to examine one’s native language that deeply. I wanted to be around words.SJL: Is there a period you’re especially interested in?LHM: The 1950s. Postwar literature. How to overcome such shattering. Deprivation and loss and futility. The works contain a lot of those feelings. As well as end-of-the-world sentiments. “Let’s die,” that kind of thing.There’s a poet named Kim Ku-yong whose works feature a Buddhist worldview, and I like that Buddhist attitude. “Life is pain anyway.” [laughs] All is nothing, nil, vain.SJL: Everything passes. LHM: We’re just wheels spinning on. I also think that the Korean language will eventually die out. The Korean we know will be gone in one hundred, two hundred years, no? Isn’t it the poet’s duty to develop the nuances of language? I think the poet’s major is not literature, but thought.SJL: What kind of language do you think it’ll become?LHM: It’ll be a hybrid language. There must be things that can’t be expressed in the megalanguage, words that existed in Korean. Isn’t it the poet’s duty to develop the nuances of language? I think the poet’s major is not literature, but thought.Pushing thought to the limits of one’s native language. So poets are national representatives of sorts, of language. “I’ve thought this far in Korean. How far have you thought in English?”Hm… But what is Korea as seen by foreigners? A tragically divided country that has yet to escape the agony of war?SJL: But I think it’s changed. If you look at K-pop, it’s not like BTS is performing on SNL wearing hanbok. LHM: There’s that vibe that K-pop gives off, though. Cheerful and stylish and glittering? A people of heung, represented by Psy? But then we also have incredible—SJL: Han!LHM: What do we do about this. [laughs] Why do we define ourselves as the “people of han”? I mean, there are so many Korean words related to sadness. Words for anger and sorrow are incredibly developed, while there aren’t that many words for joy and pleasure.SJL: I think that when you’re happy, you’re just happy—LHM: You don’t need any words. Then when you’re sad, you want to describe how sad you are in great detail because you don’t want to use the same words as someone else. But is this unique to Korea? German is probably more specific, no?SJL: Then which of “joy, anger, sorrow, pleasure” do you think Unexpected Vanilla is closest to? LHM: I wrote a lot about bittersweet moments, I think. The sadness that comes from being so happy, you think the happiness will disappear? The first poem in the collection, “Summer, When Loquat Trees Light Up,” is about you and I walking with our fingers laced together in the summer and kind of anticipating the sadness to come. Sensing that something will fade away because it shines so bright. What we feel looking at the snow before it melts. I think I wrote a lot about that. Isn’t that slightly the world of joy?SJL: I don’t think it’s all that sad. A bit of a . . . future-oriented sadness?LHM: Oh, yes, yes.SJL: Mourning a sadness that doesn’t exist yet? LHM: Sad because you’re enjoying the present, because this might fade away. “This is so nice right now, but what do I do when it’s gone?” It was like that with my exes, too.SJL: I think this is especially true of romantic relationships. [laughs]LHM: “Can it get better than this? What if there’s only misery left between us?” [laughs] That kind of fear? But even that comes from feeling good about the present.SJL: How does teaching creative writing affect your own writing? LHM: Like I mentioned earlier, we do projects together. My students seem like geniuses. I mean, they’ve decided to write. How incredible is that. I’m always inspired by them. And I also give them prompts designed to inspire. Recently we did a class on naming emotions. For example, euya. The self-disgust you feel when you wake up on a weekend and it’s two-thirty in the afternoon. “What am I doing with my life.” [laughs] It’s a word that combines the sensations of that weekend sunshine and your covers. Among the students' words, there was reugeuk. The flutter in your heart when you almost lose your footing. And toto. The feeling that you get from seeing your childhood toy pushed into a corner. The guilt, feeling sorry, your childhood memories. Rather than ready-made words like "joy" or "sadness," these are handmade names of emotions that we created specially for ourselves.Regardless of how ugly your cake is, the fact that you baked a cake is much more impressive than not having baked a cake.SJL: Fun!LHM: Isn’t it? I try to make my poetry workshops fun and enjoy them a lot, too. I went to an arts high school myself. I like writing and talking about it with others. And I don’t really scold [my students]. I’m more likely to say, “You wrote this? Amazing!” The fact that they wrote something is worthy of praise. Regardless of how ugly your cake is, the fact that you baked a cake is much more impressive than not having baked a cake. Even if you ended up with a rock-hard cake, your kitchen probably smelled delicious, you probably tried decorating it and felt the joy of making a cake, right? Great job.But am I too lenient and not discerning enough? [laughs] I’m just so proud that they’re writing! It makes me happy.  SJL: When I started translating in fall 2017, I found your post in support of the #문단_내_성폭력 [“sexual violence within the literary establishment”] movement. A lot has happened since then, such as the poet Choi Young-mi’s accusation against Ko Un and his losing the defamation suit. Is there anything you’d like to add? LHM: I have a lot to say, of course. As I said back then, I made a list of what happened to me and ended up with twenty-five people. I didn't even include any of the “lighter” counts like touching my thighs. Just direct physical and verbal sexual harassment.SJL: Oh . . . I didn’t know about that part. LHM: I only included severe cases of verbal sexual harassment; if I included everything, there would be fifty people. I started writing about it to sort it out for myself, and didn't know it would spread so widely. I'm so glad that times have changed, that people now react like, “Really?” It used to be, “Oh, that's just how it is. Don't complain. Did you hear about so-and-so?” That was the norm. People didn't believe you. [The public discourse] needs to continue so this won't happen to the next generation of poets. Just as performing jesa ceremonies for your ancestors used to be a given and now everyone says, “Please, who does jesa in this day and age?”SJL: You said your next collection is coming out in two years. What can we expect? Can you give us any hints about the title or content?LHM: My work so far has lingered around relationality. After thinking about fluidity in Unexpected Vanilla, I'd like to try something different. To go deeper within myself or with "you." Whether we can now live independently. After all, we rely on relationships because it's hard to stand on our own. I want to try thinking about my inner self more than my interpersonal relationships.SJL: This is a bit of a cheat, but is there a question you’ve always wanted to answer? LHM: I have a scene in mind. A backpacker your age goes to a used bookstore in a small country town in Europe and grabs a book with Korean on one side and English on the other. The book is very old. And the person reading it is my granddaughter!SJL: Whoa!LHM: She found her grandma’s poetry collection! This requires a couple of conditions, right? It has to be translated, I have to get married and have a baby, I have to become a grandmother. First, you have to . . . [laughs]SJL: Ah, so it needs to be translated and published. LHM: The important thing is for me to write for a long, long time before I become a grandmother.SJL: Serang Chung said something similar! That she wants to become a “grandma author.”LHM: How difficult it must be to become a grandma author. Go us!Published Jun 12, 2019   Copyright 2019 So J. LeeReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

    News & Media > News from Abroad

  • The Watchlist: May 2019

    By Tobias CarrollEach month, Tobias Carroll shares a handful of recently released or forthcoming titles in translation that he’s especially excited about. From World Editions | A Devil Comes to Town by Paolo Maurensig, translated from the Italian by Anne Milano Appel | Fiction | 120 pages | ISBN 9781642860139 | US$14.99What the publisher says: “Taut with foreboding and Gothic suspense, Paolo Maurensig gives us a refined and engaging literary parable on narcissism, vainglory, and our inextinguishable thirst for stories.”What Publishers Weekly says: “Maurensig (Theory of Shadows) skillfully handles the tale’s mysteries and ambiguities: has Father Cornelius really spotted the devil, or is he an unreliable narrator in thrall to his own infernal, Faust-inspired fictions? And is the widespread urge to write, to 'indelibly engrave ourselves on the metaphysical plate of the universe,' demonic or divine? This nested narrative is an entertaining exploration of the manifold powers—creative, confessional, corrupting—of fiction.”What I say: There’s a lot to savor in this bleakly satirical novel, from the description of an isolated town teeming with writers of varying talents to a unique spin on the idea of devils (as opposed to the devil) sowing chaos in the world. The nested structure nods to both nineteenth-century Gothic tales and postmodern lit—which in and of itself suggests the sensibility of this narrative of diabolical interests and literary ambition.  ***From Oneworld | Things That Fall from the Sky by Selja Ahava, translated from the Finnish by Emily Jeremiah and Fleur Jeremiah | Fiction | 240 pages | ISBN 9781786075413 | US$24.95What the publisher says: “Three lives are changed forever by a series of random events: a young girl loses her mother when a block of ice falls from the sky; a woman wins the jackpot twice; and a man is struck by lightning four times. Selja Ahava weaves together these unique stories in a charming, one-of-a-kind tale about just how far people will go to force life into a logical pattern they can make sense of.”What Booklist Online says: “Finnish writer Ahava’s European Union Prize-winning 2015 novel, now her first to be published in English, is a whimsical and thoughtful rumination on the terrifying randomness that dictates the course of a life.”What I say: In different hands, the plot of Things That Fall From the Sky, in which a family grapples with a sudden and bizarre death, might have felt self-consciously quirky or cloying. Instead, Ahava embraces the eccentricities of her characters and the role of randomness in the novel’s plot, pivoting from a meditation on grief into something closer in tone to the Ricky Jay-narrated prologue of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia. ***From Yale University Press | The Book of Collateral Damage by Sinan Antoon, translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright | Fiction | 312 pages | ISBN 9780300228946 | US$24.00What the publisher says: “Widely-celebrated author Sinan Antoon’s fourth and most sophisticated novel follows Nameer, a young Iraqi scholar earning his doctorate at Harvard, who is hired by filmmakers to help document the devastation of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. During the excursion, Nameer ventures to al-Mutanabbi street in Baghdad, famed for its bookshops, and encounters Wadood, an eccentric bookseller who is trying to catalogue everything destroyed by war, from objects, buildings, books and manuscripts, flora and fauna, to humans.”What Maaza Mengiste says: “Sinan Antoon is a master storyteller and The Book of Collateral Damage reaffirms his place amongst some of our very best writers. Vividly imagined and sensitively told, this is a tale of one man's exile and return, and all the distances traveled to find a semblance of home.”What I say: Antoon’s novel juxtaposes scenes from the life of Nameer, an Iraqi writer living and working in the United States during the second Gulf War, with a series of writings that he receives in correspondence. As Nameer navigates academic life, romance, and his own complex feelings about the war, Antoon balances the philosophical with the visceral, leading to a haunting denouement.***From Coach House Books | The Laws of the Skies by Grégoire Courtois, translated from the French by Rhonda Mullins | Fiction | 200 pages | ISBN 9781552453872 | US$16.95What the publisher says: "Once upon a time, a class of six-year-olds heads into the forest for a camping trip. The innocent children play games where they imagine monsters everywhere: the creaking of trees becomes a growl, the tree trunk becomes an ogre."What Publishers Weekly says: “Alone in an unforgiving nature and soon separated from any semblance of adult supervision, the brutality of the world is suddenly laid bare for children. Among them, the precociously mature Hugo dares to take a stand against Enzo in a desperate attempt at survival. Unflinching in its savagery, the nightmarish poetry of this modern Lord of the Flies is undeniable.”What I say: The Laws of the Skies takes its title from a fable told within its pages, about a mouse who learns to fly, becoming a bat—and who is subsequently attacked and blinded by vengeful birds. That description suggests a sharp turn from whimsy to menace, and it serves as a model for the novel as a whole. From the outset, we know that this tale of lost children will not have a happy ending, but the bleakness in store for these characters still has plenty of room to unnerve.***From Pica Pica Press | Sun-Tzu’s Life in the Holy City of Vilnius by Ričardas Gavelis, translated from the Lithuanian by Elizabeth Novickas | Fiction | 220 pages | ISBN 9780996630436 | US$13.99What the publisher says: “Another intellectual horror story by the author of Vilnius Poker. In this, Gavelis's last novel before his sudden death at the age of 52, the master of the macabre takes us through the life of the Sun-Tzu of Vilnius, a warrior of the political and economic changes that followed the fall of the Soviet Union. Sun-Tzu launches attacks on his enemies from his bunker hidden in the legendary underground labyrinths of Vilnius. A fantastic metaphoric voyage into the depths of good and evil.”What Dalkey Archive Press says: “Ričardas Gavelis, who passed away in August of 2002, also incorporated eastern themes into work, but brought them back to the Lithuanian setting. His last novel, The Life of Sun-Tzu in the Sacred Town of Vilnius (Sun-Tzu gyvenimas šventame Vilniaus mieste; 2003), was well received and seen as his swan song. The work consists of linked non-narrative chapters about a man imbued with the philosophy of Sun-Tzu.” What I say: Ričardas Gavelis’s life of an unnamed man coming of age and discovering his own unique philosophy of life abounds with questionable morality, deft wordplay, and jarring narrative transitions. Numerous major characters meet untimely fates, creating a sense of a world in which ethics and fate have been turned on their head—and, in turn, helping to explain just why this novel’s protagonist embraces Sun-Tzu’s ethos for his own life. ***From White Pine Press | What Makes a City? by Park Seongwon, translated from the Korean by Chung Hwa Chang and Andrew James Keast | Fiction | 188 pages | ISBN 9781945680205 | US$16.00What the publisher says: "What Makes a City? provides the reader with an intelligent perspective on the strange culture of our times and a series of adventures through which we explore universal human problems. Family, education, the media, popular culture, technology, alienation, financial power or the lack thereof . . . These are among the most prominent components of the eight stories which comprise this book, in which characters struggle—sometimes in despair, but usually with a sense of humor—to understand or at least accept their place in a world that often makes no sense."What Korean Literature Now says: “What makes up a city? The novel answers this question by stating that a city has something hidden inside, something that remains untamed by civilization. Through Park’s novel, we come to discover that although we may travel outside a city, the outside is actually the irrational that is hidden inside.” What I say: The stories in What Makes a City? abound with contradictions: they incorporate everything from quotidian family scenes to high-concept narratives of cryogenic sleep and futuristic debt. What connects them is a sense of storytelling, in both its power and its limitations. This book abounds with questions of stories, both those we tell ourselves and those we process to make sense of the world—even when the world around us lacks all reason.  Looking for more reading suggestions? Check out Tobias Carroll’s recommendations from last month.Published May 15, 2019   Copyright 2019 Tobias CarrollReturn to WWB DailyLeave Your Comment /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'wwborders'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.comments powered by Disqus

    News & Media > News from Abroad

  • The Queer “I”: The Tenth Queer Issue

    Susan Harris introduces our tenth Queer issue.Nearly a decade ago, our former editor Rohan Kamicheril planned an issue of queer writing. The issue proved so popular, and so reflective of our editorial vision, that we decided to make it an annual event. You’ll find queer writing at WWB throughout the year, but our June issues have provided a space to bring this multiplicity of voices into conversation with each other and with readers. This month we bring you our tenth Queer issue.This time around we’re presenting nine short prose works and a single poem. The characters are united by several themes: they seek success in love and work; they find themselves in the grip of romantic obsession and preteen confusion; others find themselves points of obtuse (in multiple senses) triangles and objects of surprising affections. All the pieces are told in the first person, lending intimacy and immediacy to the events they describe.Short fiction has been a mainstay of our queer issues from the very first, showcasing some of the form’s master practitioners. This year is no different. Afro-Caribbean writer Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro won the National Short Story Prize of the PEN Club of Puerto Rico in 2013 for her collection Las Negras. Known for exploring the limits of female characters who challenge hierarchies of power, here she traces a relationship that morphs from bullying to bond. Muscular young teen Elena fights her way into a tough boys’ gang as they pummel the effeminate Ricardo. As she navigates often-confusing social and sexual currents, and faces her own crush on the alluring Johana, her relationships with both the gang members and their target evolve.The Italian writer Matteo Bianchi, too, is adept at exploring characters who move with tentative steps across unfamiliar territory, often defying expectations along the way. His work Cher upon a Midnight Clear, a “fairy tale for adults,” looks at a little boy’s love of what his parents consider girls’ toys. The prolific Bianchi, whose work also includes an edited volume of American gay fiction in Italian translation, first graced our pages in August 2004 with “Maternal Love,” an antic, affectionate tale of two very different people whose paths cross at the Padua pride parade. He’s one of our favorites, and we’re delighted to welcome him back with a story set in the late eighties. An anxious college student picks up a working man, then finds himself falling for him. As they warily move into a relationship, Bianchi deftly sketches the milieu, showing the jumpy narrator warily maneuvering among friends, family, and fellow students as his feelings for Alessandro deepen.  Can these men defy societal and familial expectations to find happiness? As in “Maternal Love,” Bianchi provides a surprising, deeply satisfying answer.  As celebrated Chinese author Lu Min demonstrates, power structures can be inverted and exploited, and boundaries defied. Lu, a rare out lesbian in China, has collected multiple awards for her fiction, which has been translated into nine languages. In “Scissors, Shining” she finds a young apprentice to a village tailor measuring clients and sizing up their relationships with his enigmatic boss. When a neglected wife attempts to interest the tailor in a more intimate assessment, the apprentice finds himself caught in a different sort of calculation. Min deftly captures the woman’s desperation and the tailor’s inexplicable lack of interest through the lens of the apprentice’s innocence, as the bewildered teen struggles to make sense of the emotional turmoil. As Master Song’s tiny shop becomes a site of assumptions overturned and boundaries violated, Min captures the potential for abuse in all hierarchies.The power structures that provide the mooring for Montenegrin novelist and screenwriter Stefan Bošković’s short story are both personal and professional. In his “Search: Porn” a fading fiction writer arrives at the home of his editor (and former lover) for a dinner that quickly goes pear-shaped. Arlen thinks they’ll be negotiating edits to his short story collection; instead, his editor and the latter’s new girlfriend serve up a demonstrative display, interrupting their embraces only long enough for his editor to announce that he intends not to publish the book at all. Reeling from this double rejection, Arlen brings the evening to a vivid conclusion worthy of 2016 Festival of European Short Stories runner-up Boškovic. Is outright rejection worse than being strung along? Icelandic poet and novelist Kári Tulinius asks in “Abel’s Autobiography.” Abel falls in love with Jerome, who is in an open relationship with the genderfluid Lionel. Abel’s infatuation with Jerome is soon equaled by his jealousy of Lionel; he turns to spying, stalking, and a singularly poor decision, all related in a breathless syntax that mirrors his headlong obsession.In “So Long, Luise,” noted French novelist Céline Minard asks what happens when our syntax is not our own. Minard, who has explored topics including space travel, medieval history, and the Western,  provides a giddy peek into an elaborate literary hoax. While outlining her will, the narrator, a Parisian celebrated for writing in English, cheerfully confesses that, in fact, her books were written in French; the English versions are translations. She traces the impetus for her imposture to her great love, Paige, an Australian whose mother tongue launched the author’s professional (and personal) triumphs.Speaking of triumphs, we’re particularly pleased to salute the increasing visibility of queer writers in Korea with a selection edited by star translator Anton Hur.  As Hur notes in his exuberant introduction, Korean literature has long had queer undercurrents, but only recently have writers felt free to be explicitly out. Highlighting the work of four contemporary voices, Hur brings us some of the freshest, most exciting work we’ve published.Lee Jong San’s novel Customer is the first of a trilogy that takes place on a future Earth. The narrator, Suni, comes from a desert region whose residents are known as “worms.” Selected for a scholarship to a prestigious school in a well-to-do city, she begins a romance with her roommate, an androgyne, and encounters the subculture of “customers,” people who undergo a variety of body modifications, or “customs.” In Customer Lee creates a world where people can mutate and enhance their physical forms to match their emotional make-ups.The body looms large in Lee Hyemi’s poetry, as well, which is characterized by fluidity and immersion. In “The Cupboard with Strawberry Jam” Lee contributes an erotic ode grounded in lush metaphor. Lee has spoken out on sexual harassment, both within Korean literary circles and the global #metoo movement; as with her activism, her poetry recreates and holds space for agency and queerness in female sexuality.In counterpoint to the work of Lee and Lee, Kim Hyejin’s novel About My Daughter and Kim Bong-gon’s “College Folk” confront the shaming and rejection faced by many who identify as queer, often by those closest to them. In an excerpt from About My Daughter, a widow invites her underemployed daughter to move in, but is less hospitable to a third party. The mother, a caregiver in a nursing home, struggles to accept her daughter’s sexuality and her partner; the younger women, in turn, fight poverty and sexual discrimination. In her portrait of the resistant mother and the stubborn couple, Kim draws a nuanced portrait of a clash both generational and social. A student saves a professor from scandal, then finds himself in a position to embroil them both in a new one in Kim Bong-gon’s “College Folk.” In an interview with the Korean Literature Institute, the author notes that the story was his first in which he both took his time and included his own experiences, and declares, “it contains my three favorite elements: queer, liberal arts, and romance.”“Queer, liberal arts, and romance” are some of our favorite elements, too, and we find ourselves in increasingly larger company in this than when our first Queer Issue came out in 2010: same-sex marriage is legal in the US, Ireland, and many other countries, most recently Taiwan; the Edith Windsor case has granted same-sex spouses the benefits of heterosexual couples; Iceland, Belgium, Luxembourg, Serbia, and Ireland have elected openly gay prime ministers, and an openly gay man is among the many declared candidates for the US presidency. Yet Brunei recently declared same-sex activity punishable by stoning; the US military now bars transgender applicants; and the self-professed homophobia of Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, stoked the atmosphere that made it necessary for our Afro-Brazilian contributor Jean Wyllys to flee for his safety. Come what may, rest assured we’ll still be here with stories that celebrate the queer experience in all its plurality. We hope you’ll enjoy the selection we present here.© 2019 by Susan Harris. All rights reserved.Read more from the June–July 2019 issueFurther ReadingKorean Literature Is Stepping OutAbout My DaughterScissors, Shining

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  • Korean Literature Is Stepping Out

    Translator Anton Hur on the increased visibility of queer Korean writers​. Am I proud of this mini-feature of Korean queer literature in translation courtesy of Words Without Borders? Hell yeah! We have Lee Jong San, the second out queer Korean writer to publish a book of fiction, and an excerpt from that very book in question: Customer! We have Kim Bong-gon, the third out queer Korean writer to publish a book of fiction, and an excerpt from that very book in question: “College Folk” from Speed, Summer! (The only reason WWB hasn’t published the fourth out queer Korean writer to publish a book of fiction is because a fourth book doesn’t exist yet. And yes, WWB has published the first out queer Korean writer to publish a book of fiction as well, thanks for asking.)Korean literature has always had an embarrassment of riches when it comes to queer literature, but having out queer writers—as opposed to closeted queer writers or writers who were out to their translators and friends but not to the public, etc.—was somewhat elusive. But it’s history waiting to happen, and boy is it happening. Last year, I went to a panel for queer literature hosted by Seoul National University where Lee Jong San and Kim Bong-gon sat next to each other and I thought, Damn! We can fill an entire panel now! Kim Bi and Kim Hyun don’t have to be alone anymore!You don’t have to be an out queer writer to produce unmistakably gorgeous queer Korean literature. I mean, have you seen how gay Korean literature has always been??? But in case you needed a reminder, we have Lee Hyemi’s sensuous poem “The Cupboard with Strawberry Jam” and Kim Hyejin’s About My Daughter, both works that also deal with the closet and what stays “hidden and sweet” or comes marching out of it with a lesbian-in-law in tow.Queer rights in Korea has taken a battering in recent years: we have a homophobic president, witch hunts against gay soldiers (military service is compulsory in Korea; you want us to serve in the military and go to jail? Make up your goddamn minds!), and Christian fanatics are coming down strong—and violently—against queer pride all over the peninsula. But we are fighting back. We have always been fighting back, but there has been something different in the air these past couple of years: the out authors, their books that suddenly seem to be doing quite well, and the domestic and international response, nay, demand for their work is mounting by the day. In these very pages, I once wrote about a lunar sorority of queer Korean literary translators. Now, thanks to our authors, we’re ready to step forth into the sun. "Korean Literature Is Stepping Out" © 2019 by Anton Hur. All rights reserved.Read more from the June–July 2019 issueFurther ReadingScissors, ShiningAbel’s Autobiography About My Daughter

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  • When do you accept applications for the grant?

    Applications are accepted all year round and evaluated on a quarterly basis. - Deadline: March 31st / Result Announcement: end of May - Deadline: June 30th / Result Announcement: end of August - Deadline: September 30th / Result Announcement: end of November - Deadline: December 30th / Result Announcement: end of Feb the next year

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  • What documents do I need to submit to apply for the grant?

    1. Sample Translation - 20 A4 pages (from the beginning of the book excluding the preface and/or introduction) - A poetry sample must include the first ten poems of the collection - 25 lines per page (double-spaced): Font size 11 on Hangul HWP and 12 on MS Word - Personal information such as the applicant’s name or affiliation must not be included.2. The corresponding pages from the original Korean text (in PDF format)3. CV of co-translator(s), if applicable4. A book proposal written in the target language

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  • Who is eligible to apply for the grant?

    ​We provide overseas publishers (and translators) with partial funding towards translation and publication costs. However, in certain cases, we may offer either translation or publication support.

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  • What types of books are eligible for the grant?

    ​You may apply for the grant with a literary title or a humanities title on Korean culture.Once you submit your application, we will evaluate the book’s eligibility for the grant.

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  • What is the amount of the grant?

    ​The amount of the translation or publication grant is decided in consideration of the genre, language and publication cost, etc.

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  • What courses are available at LTI Translation Academy, and how do they differ?

    LTI Translation Academy offers three courses: Regular Course, Special Course and Translation Atelier.Regular Course · 5 language groups (English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Japanese) · Around 6 students in each class · Two-year program (4 semesters) · Classes on weekdays between 09:00 and 18:00 · Up to 15 hours a week · Academy Fellowship availableSpecial Course · 7 language groups (English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Japanese) · Up to 8 students in each class · Weekly two-hour classes (19:00~21:00)Translation Atelier · 7 language groups (English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Japanese) · Up to 3 students in each class · Fortnightly two-hour classes (19:00~21:00) · Only for graduates of Regular Course or Special Course

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  • When can I apply, and when does the academic year start?

    ​- Regular Course: Applications are accepted in April, and the course starts in September.- Special Course Translation Atelier: Applications are accepted in February, and the​course starts in April.

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  • Who is eligible to apply for LTI Translation Academy?

    ​- Regular Course: A bachelor’s degree * A foreign applicant may submit proof of registration and an academic transcript.- Special Course: Anyone interested in translating Korean literature- Translation Atelier: Graduates of Regular Course or Special Course

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  • What courses are available at LTI Translation Academy?

    ​Our curriculum focuses on practical translation of Korean literature into foreign languages. In Regular Course, in addition to classes like Korean Literature, Korean Culture, Korean Language, there are opportunities to gain first-hand experience of Korean culture through literary excursions.

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  • What languages are available at LTI Translation Academy?

    ​- Regular Course: English, French, German, Spanish and Russian (5 languages)- Special Course Translation Atelier: English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Japanese (7 languages)

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  • What are the benefits of studying at LTI Translation Academy? What are popular career paths after graduation?

    ​As the world’s only educational institution specializing in Korean literature translation, LTI Translation Academy offers classes in literary translation for free (except for the annual registration fee of 100,000 KRW). In particular, native speakers enrolled in the Fellowship Program receive round-trip airfare and monthly stipend, which enable them to focus solely on their studies. ​The graduates of LTI Translation Academy (845 as of the end of 2015) go on to become professional translators of Korean literature—103 recipients of LTI Korea Translation Grant, 28 winners of LTI Korea Translation Award for Aspiring Translators. In particular, the Fellowship graduates continue to serve as a bridge between Korea and the wider world upon returning to their home countries.

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  • Do you accept co-translations?

    ​No, we do not accept co-translations. The purpose of LTI Korea Translation Award for Aspiring Translators is a translation contest designed to discover new talent in literary translation.

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  • Are there any guidelines for completing my translation manuscript?

    ​There are no specific guidelines. You may use either Hangul or Word. Please make sure your manuscript is presented in a format that is easy for our judges to read.

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  • Do I need to translate just one of the set texts?

    ​Yes, please select and translate just one of the set texts.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • Do you only accept applications online?

    ​Yes, please send you application and translation manuscript to newtransaltors@klti.or.kr

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • Do I have to submit my translation manuscript in the PDF format?

    ​No, we accept translation manuscripts in PDF, Hangul and Word formats.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • What kind of books are eligible for the grant?

    Applications are accepted for Korean literary works (except children’s picture books) and humanities and social science titles. Please click the link below for further information on our Translation Grant Program: https://www.ltikorea.or.kr/kr/contents/business_trans_1_1/view.doYou may not apply for our translation grants with books which have been translated and published overseas, or whose copyrights have already been sold overseas.

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  • How do I apply for LTI Korea Translation Grant?

    ​Applications are accepted on our website only. Please visit application site (https://www.ltikorea.or.kr/kr/application/applicationList.do), and create an account in order to make an online application.

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  • How do I apply for this grant?

    ​The overseas publishers must complete both copyright and translation contracts before making an application on our English website (registration required). Please contact our staff in charge of each language group for further information.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • When can I apply? What selection procedure is there?

    ​Applications are accepted all year round on our website. Applications will be reviewed by a selection committee consisting of experts from relevant fields. For applications received by the end of each month, the results are announced in the following month.

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  • Can I translate from English into another foreign language?

    ​We do not normally support translations via another language. However, you can still apply for our publication grant.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • If I wish to publish a collection of stories or poetry, do I need to sign contracts with all the copyright holders and translators?

    ​Yes, you must sign contracts with all the copyright holders and translations involved in the collection.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • How do I get into LTI Translation Academy?

    ​The selection process consists of three stages: application review, translation test, and interview.In the first round, we select candidates based on their applications and personal statements. Next, the one-hour written test held at our test site involves translating a short except (about one A4 page) from a Korean short story into a target language.Lastly, the interview evaluates your understanding of Korean literature and linguistic ability. If you live overseas, it is possible to submit a translation sample in the place of the written test, and conduct a phone or Skype interview instead.

    About LTI Korea > Customer Service Center > FAQ

  • Who are the teachers, and when are the classes?

    ​Our faculty consists of professional translators with extensive experience of translating Korean literature and professors at leading universities in Korea and abroad. In addition, foreign writers residing in Korea are invited to teach classes to produce translations that are highly marketable in overseas markets.In addition, lectures by literary critics as well as researchers in Korean culture and translation theory aimed at students of Regular Course enhance their understanding of Korean culture and literature.The class schedule changes on a termly basis and the timetable is finalized one month prior to the start of the term.

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  • Call for Overseas Translation Workshop Program 2020

    Overseas Translation Workshop Program 2020 Through the Overseas Translation Workshop Program, LTI Korea provides funding assistance for Korean literature translation workshops held abroad.We seek applications from overseas universities with Korean studies programs. 1. Introduction: Our grants cover the costs of running a Korean literature translation workshop and inviting a Korean writer.2. Eligibility: Overseas universities with Korean language or Korean literature programs in all language groups are eligible to apply.※ Number of Recipients: around 15 universities (subject to change)3. Prerequisitesa) Faculty with the ability to guide a Korean literature translation workshop, and adequate facilities to run a translation workshop program for one term (at least one session per week for three months)b) At least 7 students with sufficient linguistic proficiency and literary understanding4. Grant Details: Support fund and the costs of inviting Korean writers.a) Partial funding towards operational costs and faculty fees- Faculty fees to be paid in accordance with the university’s pay scale.- Operational costs: coordinator fees, promotional and running costs, etc.b) We provide funding (travel expenses and honoraria) for inviting the Korean author/scholar of the set text to participate in the workshop.※ Unless in exceptional circumstances, we transfer the grant into the university’s bank account.※ The exact amount of the grant is decided in consideration of a number of factors including the total budget and local prices.※ The grant is paid in euros for countries using the euro and in US dollars for all other countries.5. Obligationsa) Korean literature translation seminars- Translate Korean literature (1 short story / 20 poems) into a foreign language. The chosen text must be fully translated during the seminars.- Period: 12 weeks (at least once a week)b) Korean literature translation workshop and author lecture- Period: 2~3 days- Workshop: QA and discussion with the author (or scholar) of the set text (at least two two-hour sessions)- Literary event: lecture for students in the Korean department or general readers, discussion with scholars and authors, readings (at least once)※ LTI Korea may request amendments to the university’s seminar/workshop/literary event proposal.c) Final report and proof of expenditure must be submitted within one month of the completion of the project.※ Please use the form provided by LTI Korea.6. Application and Selection Processa) Application Period: December 2, 2019 ~ January 5, 2020 (24:00 KST)b) How to Apply: Applications are accepted by email only (academy@klti.or.kr).c) Required Documents1) Application (in Korean or English). Please use the form provided.- Your application must include detailed information about the amount of funding requested, a budget plan, the workshop/seminar schedule, the set text and author, the department/program and participating students.※ The set text is to be finalized in consultation with LTI Korea.2) Resumes and personal statements of the teaching staff written in Korean or English (no set format).3) The pay scale of the universityd) Selection Criteria- Work experience of the selected faculty member(s)- The standards of the Korean department (students’ linguistic proficiency, participation of MA/PhD students, etc.)- Concreteness/feasibility of the workshop and seminar plan※ Priority will be given to the following:- Applications that include a plan to utilize the final translated text (publication, online posting, journal submission, application for translation grants, etc.)* If applicable, please state how translations from previous workshops were utilized.- Workshops in target languages not included in the Translation Academy's curriculum (English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese).e) Notification of Result: End of January 2020 (expected)7. Further Information- For enquiries, please contact Heesu Choi (+82 2 6919 7756 / academy@klti.or.kr).- Workshops scheduled for the first half of 2020 will be given preference.- Submitted documents will not be returned.- Translation seminars and workshops using an intermediary language are not eligible.

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.50

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.49

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  • Vol.45 (English)

    Vol.45Autumn 2019

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.48

    Archive > Newsletter > Newsletter

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.47

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.46

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.45

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  • Vol.44 (English)

    Korean Literature Now vol.44

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • 2019 Korean Literature Showcase

    2019 Korean Literature Showcase June 18 ~ 22 at COEX, Seoul Choi Ina Books The Korean Literature Showcase is an event hosted by the Korean Culture and Information Service (KOCIS) and Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea),two public institutions afiiliated withthe Ministry of Culture, Tourism, and Sports of Korea. The main theme of this years showcase is Making New Waves: Korean Literature in the World. The Korean Literature Showcase is a three-day event consisting of two sets of workshops, two-day author reading, and a translator mentoring program. We are looking forward to seeing you in Seoul! Pre-registration DATE June 18th - June 22nd, 2019 REGISTRATION FEE 1) International Translation Publication Workshop: Complimentary 2) Evening with Writers: 3,000 KRW REGISTRATION PROCESS Naver reservation page https://booking.naver.com/booking/5/bizes/242411?area=bni

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.44

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.43

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.42

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  • Vol.43 (English)

    Vol.43 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • Call for Applications to the Regular Course 2019

    Call for Applications to the Regular Course The LTI Korea Translation Academy is looking for talented applicants who will rise to the challenge of translating Korean literature, thereby contributing to the growth of its global readership. LTI Korea Translation Academy Fellowship The fellowship is open to native speakers of English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. The fellowship is designed to allow foreign students to devote themselves fully to their study of literary translation during their stay in Korea. □ The fellowship includes: round-trip airfare, monthly stipend of 1.6 million won, visa sponsorship and tuition waiver □ About the Program○ Languages: English, French, German, Russian, Spanish○ Eligibility - Foreigners and overseas Koreans with a bachelor’s degree or above can apply. - Applicants who are not involved in any economic activities in Korea when the course starts (September 2019).○ Number of Fellowships: 4 for each language ○ Curriculum: Translation of Literary Texts, Study of Translation Styles, Korean Literature, Korean Culture, Korean Language - The program also offers activities such as workshops with Korean writers and literary excursions.○ Faculty: Professors of literature, literary translation, and Korean language and culture○ Duration: September 2019 – June 2021 ※ Fall Semester: September – December | Spring Semester: March – June □ How to Apply○ Application Documents - Application form, personal statement written in Korean - Letter of recommendation: The recommender should email us directly at academy@klti.or.kr. The letter should be written in Korean or English. - Sample translation of 권여선, 「전갱이의 맛」,『이효석문학상 수상작품집 2018』(생각정거장, 2018) · From the 1st line of p.47 (starting with 가끔 아무 말도) to the 12th line of p.52(ending in 놀람을 선사하는가.). · The title must also be translated. - A certificate of bachelor's degree ※ The prescribed forms can be downloaded from the notice section of our website: LTIKorea.or.kr/en. The application form needs to be filled online in Korean. ※ Scanned copies of postgraduate certificates must be submitted (certificates in languages other than Korean or English need to be translated into either Korean or English and notarized or apostilled). □ Selection Criteria○ Application review, sample translation review, and telephone interview○ Applications can be made online at: http://lms.ltikorea.or.kr○ Applications should be received no later than 16:00 (Korean standard time) on April 30, 2019. □ Selection Process○ Application period: April 1 – 30, 2019○ Announcement of candidates for telephone interview: May 23, 2019○ Telephone interview: May 27 – May 31, 2019○ Final result announcement: June 17, 2019 Contact: Ms. Kwon Bobae (academy@klti.or.kr)

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  • A Platform for Peace and Communication

    A Platform for Peace and Communication The Literary Festival is held May 20-22 at the ARA Art Center, Seoul. ● Pre-registration Date March 25th-May 16th, 2019 REGISTRATION FEE Complimentary (Registration Fee is NOT required) REGISTRATION PROCESS Naver reservation page * For more information, please visit the Naver Reservation page. https://booking.naver.com/booking/5/bizes/222268?area=bni ● OVERVIEW Title A Platform for Peace and Communication Date May 20th-22th, 2019 Venue ARA ARTCENTER, Seoul, Republic of Korea Host Literature Translation Institute of Korea ● PROGRAM Program May 20th (Mon) 10:00-12:30 Opening Ceremony Opening Remarks : Kim Sain Keynote Speech : Choi Won-shik 14:00-17:00 Session1. Diaspora and the Diasporic Life_ Moderator : Jung CheolHoon Speaker: Shin Claire sun yung, Kim Hyuk, Park Mikhail, Lim Chulwoo, Cho Hae-jin May 21th (TUE) 10:00-13:00 Session2. In a Nation shadowed by the DMZ_ Moderator : Shin Soojeong Speaker: Heo Yeon, Bonn Park, Immanuel Kim, Kim Yeonsu,Lee Chang-dong 14:00-17:00 Session3. Why we write_ Moderator_Moderator : Shim Bo-Seon Speaker: Langvad Lee Maja, Che sil, Kang Young-sook May 22th (Wed) 10:00-13:00 Session4. Korean Literature and Culture Seen from Without_ Moderator : Choi Dong-ho Speaker: Hua Shi, Gary Yong Ki Pak, Trotzig Astrid, Jeon Sungtae, Shin Yong-mok 14:00-17:00 Session5. To Live as Minority_ Moderator : Chung Eun-Gwi Speaker: Jeong Uisin, Jin Renshun, Jane Jeong Trenka, Nick Farewell, Kim Insuk, Kim Hyesoon 15:00-16:00 Closing Ceremony

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  • Call for 18th LTI Korea Translation Award for Aspiring Translators 2019

    The 18th LTI Korea Translation Award for Aspiring Translators(2019)The 18th LTI Korea Translation Award for Aspiring Translators seeks to discover new talent in literary translation who will serve as a bridge between Korean and global literatures. Target languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and VietnameseSet texts: Please choose one from the list below. 구 분 작품명 저자 수록도서 고전 「김영철전」 홍세태* 박희병, 정길수 옮김 『전란의 소용돌이 속에서』 (돌베개, 2007) 근대 「장삼이사」 최명익 『비 오는 길』(문학과 지성사, 2004) 현대 「다른 기억」 김혜진 『소설 보다: 봄-여름』(문학과 지성사, 2018)Eligibility: Applications are welcome from translators of all nationalities who have not yet received an official translation grant or published a translated work of Korean literature in their target language. Co-translations are not accepted. ※ Applicants whose previous translations only appeared in LTI Korea Translation Academy and/or Translation Atelier collections are eligible. Prize:- One winner will be selected in each language category.- Each winner will be awarded 5,000,000 KRW and a plaque.※ The prize for overseas residents includes a trip to Seoul(round-trip airfare and accommodation) to attend the award ceremony. Requirements- Application(Please download the application form from our website.- Translation manuscript(in PDF format)※ You must translate the entire text including the title.※ Personal information(your name, school, address, etc.) must not appear anywhere on the submitted manuscript. Applications are accepted by email only: newtranslators@klti.or.kr Application Period: June 1 ~ July 26(24:00 KST), 2019 Announcement of Results: The results will be announced in October 18, 2019 on our website and all winners will be notified individually.Award Ceremony: Mid-December 2019For further enquiries, please contact Lee Yoomi: - newtranslators@klti.or.kr - +82-(0)2-6919-7752

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  • Call for 2019 Translators in Residence

    2019 Translator-in-Residence The LTI Korea hosts 2019 Translator-in-Residence program to offer translators from abroad an opportunity to gain deeper understanding of Korean literature. Participants of the program will have the opportunity to hands-on experience Korean literary culture and nurture their literary translation skills. Target Participants (Qualifications)Translators, scholars and other translation/publication professionals residing overseas who meet one of the following conditions:- Has had at least 1 translated work (literature/culture/arts) published overseas (including literary magazine)- Has made a significant contribution to the dissemination of Korean literature overseas - Has been the recipient of a Korean or international prize or translation grant for the translation of a Korean literary, cultural or artistic text ※ Please include specific details: name of the prize or literary magazine, year of receipt, etc. Program Period: July 2019 – November 2019 Support Offered- Financial Support: Living expenses, roundtrip airfare, and accommodation- Activities Provided: meetings with writers, translation seminars, etc. (Translation seminars will only be provided from July to August. Please apply within this period if you wish to participate in this program.)※ All programs will be conducted in Korean. Length of Stay: 21 days within the program period Applicants are asked to submit the following documents by email (academy@klti.or.kr):1) Residency program application form (fixed format, can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website)2) Personal statement Translation research activity proposal (any format, around 3 pages of A4)3) Agreement to the collection of personal information (can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) APPLICATION DEADLINE: APRIL 21st 24:00 KST Selection Announcement: Applicants will be notified of their result in May. The list of selected candidates will also be announced on the LTI Korea website (http://www.ltikorea.or.kr). Final Report: All participants of this program are required to turn in a final report (fixed format) within 1 month of completion. ContactDivision of Education Program, Heesu Choi(academy@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7756)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.41

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  • Vol.42 (English)

    Vol.42 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • Overseas Translation Workshop Program for 2019

    Overseas Translation Workshop Program for 2019 LTI Korea organizes translation workshops at prestigious foreign universities with Korean literature or Korean studies programs to help foster and encourage potential translators of Korean literature. We are now accepting applications to the program for 2019. 1. Target Language: All languages2. Number of Recipients: around 10 universities※ The number of recipients can differ depending on circumstances.3. EligibilityUniversities with faculties who can guide the translation of the Korean short-story or poem into the target language and at least 7 bachelor’s or master’s students with sufficient proficiency in Korean to be able to translate it.4. Grant Details: Faculty fees, Coordinator fees, Running costs1) Funding to organize a translation workshop in whichstudents meet once a week for 12 weeks to translate a Korean short-story or poem.※ Translation seminars and workshops using an intermediary language for translation are ineligible for the grant.2) Funding to invite the author of the story/poem to participate in a 2~3 day translation session with the participants of the workshop※ The university is responsible for planning and organizing the workshop. ※ Workshops scheduled for the first half of 2019 will be given preference.5. Grant Amount1) Around USD 6,000 to cover faculty and coordinator fees, and running costs. The exact amount will be decided after application review.2) Additional subsidy for the writer’s honorarium, airfare, and hotel charges.3) Applications can be made in the local currency.6. Required Documents1) An official application form, in either Korean or English, containing detailed information about the desired grant amount, the workshop’s schedule, the overseeing department, participating students, the writer, and the story to be translated. 2) Resumes and personal statements of the participating faculties ineither Korean or English(no set format)※ The text should be by a living writer, but must not have been previously translated in the target language.※ Submitted documents will not be returned.7. Selection Criteria- The applying university’s ability to organize a translation workshop for Korean literature: the faculties’ experience in translating Korean literature and the Korean language proficiency of the students- The applying university’s interest towards Korean literature and the ability to carry out the workshop enthusiastically※ Priority will be given to the following:Applications that include a plan to utilize the final translated text (publication as a book or in a journal, etc.)Workshops in target languages not included in the Translation Academy's curriculum. (Languages taught at the Academy include English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese.)8. How to Apply Applications should be emailed to academy@klti.or.kr9. Application DeadlineJanuary 11 (Fri), 2019 (Korean standard time)10. Notification: February 2019

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.40

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  • Call for 2019 International Exchange Program

    International Exchange Program From 2019 onwards, the International Exchange Program will be operated as an open call program. Please refer to the guidelines for details. 1. Eligibility - Organizations such as overseas publishers, overseas Korean studies programs, international literary festival planning committees - Individuals such as authors, translators, and scholars. 2. Grant Details - Literary events or activities held in or outside Korea - Academic events or activities related to Korean literature and translation held in or outside Korea - Other events or activities related to the globalization of Korean literature held in or outside Korea ※ Events already held by the date the results are announced are ineligible 3. Support Offered Direct expenses (promotion, remuneration, rent, airfare, lodging, local transportation, project expenses, etc.) ※ Regular operating expenses (personnel, office operation, or business expenses) will not be subsidized 4. Grant Amount The grant amount will be decided based on the budget breakdown provided by the applicant, taking into consideration the local prices and LTI Korea’s budget. ※ The grant amount will be paid in American dollars expect for countries where the euro is used. 5. Required Documents i. Application form (prescribed format, English or Korean) - Include details like grant amount, event schedule, status update, etc. ii. Introduction of the organizing institution and person in charge (free format, English or Korean) - Include name of institution, year of establishment, details of previously held events, etc. iii. Other supporting documents (detailed event plan, invitation letters, contracts, promotional materials, etc. Invitation letters are compulsory in case of inviting people.) 6. Application Deadline Announcement QuarterDeadlineAnnouncement1~ 3. 31.April end2~ 6. 30.July end3~ 9. 30.October end4~ 12. 31.January end ※ Events already held by the date the results are announced are ineligible. ※ The application deadline is 24:00 Korea time. ※ 2019 Q1 applications are due on November 30, 2018. 7. How to Apply Applications should be emailed to exchange@klti.or.kr 8. Selection Criteria Event plan, budget, promotional impact for Korean literature and translation, applying institution’s organizational capability, etc. 9. Post-selection Procedure i. MOU signing ii. Payment of first installment iii. Event iv. Final expense report ※ Receipts and other proofs of expenses should be submitted within one month of the event v. Balance payment ※ The grant will be paid out in two installments, expect for cases where LTI Korea deems it necessary to pay out the entire grant in one installment. 10. Note - Submitted documents will not be returned. - LTI Korea may ask the applicant to submit additional documents or to adjust project details. - The applicant must execute the budget as per the grant amount and details approved by LTI Korea. - Contact : European Languages Team (exchange@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7742)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.39

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  • Vol.41 (English)

    Vol.41 (Anniversary Special)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.38

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.37

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.36

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.35

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  • Vol.40 (English)

    Vol.40

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.34

    Archive > Newsletter > Newsletter

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.33

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  • Vol.39 (English)

    Vol.39 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.32

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  • Call for 2018 Translator-in-Residence

    2018 Translator-in-Residence The LTI Korea hosts 2018 Translator-in-Residence program to offer the very best translators from abroad the opportunity to come face to face with the flow of Korean literary and creative culture and gain a deeper understanding of Korean literature. The experience is intended to facilitate the production of truly outstanding translations. Target Participants (Qualifications) Translators, scholars and other translation/publication professionals residing overseas who meet one of the following conditions: - Has had at least 1 translated work (literature/culture/arts) published overseas - Has been the recipient of a Korean or international prize for the translation of a Korean literary, cultural or artistic text - Has made a significant contribution to the dissemination of Korean literature overseas Program Period: July 2018 November 2018 Support Offered - Financial Support: Living expenses (1.5 million KRW/30 days) and return airfare, accommodation - Activities Provided: meetings between translators and writers, literary tours, translations seminars, etc. (Activities will only be provided from July to August. Please apply within this period if you wish to participate in the activities above.) Length of Stay: 30 days within the program period Applicants are asked to submit the following documents by email (hschoi12@klti.or.kr): 1) Residency program application form (fixed format, can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) 2) Personal statement (any format, around 3 pages of A4) 3) Translation research activity proposal (any format, around 4 pages of A4) 4) Agreement to the collection of personal information (can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) APPLICATION DEADLINE: APRIL 22th 18:00 KST Selection Announcement: Applicants will be notified of their status in May. The list of successful candidates will also be put up on the LTI Korea website (http://www.ltikorea.or.kr). Contact Education Research Team, Heesu Choi(hschoi12@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7754)

    News & Media > Notice

  • Call for 2018 Translator-in-Residence

    2018 Translator-in-Residence The LTI Korea hosts 2018 Translator-in-Residence program to offer the very best translators from abroad the opportunity to come face to face with the flow of Korean literary and creative culture and gain a deeper understanding of Korean literature. The experience is intended to facilitate the production of truly outstanding translations. Target Participants (Qualifications) Translators, scholars and other translation/publication professionals residing overseas who meet one of the following conditions: - Has had at least 1 translated work (literature/culture/arts) published overseas - Has been the recipient of a Korean or international prize for the translation of a Korean literary, cultural or artistic text - Has made a significant contribution to the dissemination of Korean literature overseas Program Period: July 2018 November 2018 Support Offered - Financial Support: Living expenses (1.5 million KRW/30 days) and return airfare, accommodation - Activities Provided: meetings between translators and writers, literary tours, translations seminars, etc. (Activities will only be provided from July to August. Please apply within this period if you wish to participate in the activities above.) Length of Stay: 30 days within the program period Applicants are asked to submit the following documents by email (hschoi12@klti.or.kr): 1) Residency program application form (fixed format, can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) 2) Personal statement (any format, around 3 pages of A4) 3) Translation research activity proposal (any format, around 4 pages of A4) 4) Agreement to the collection of personal information (can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) APPLICATION DEADLINE: APRIL 22th 18:00 KST Selection Announcement: Applicants will be notified of their status in May. The list of successful candidates will also be put up on the LTI Korea website (http://www.ltikorea.or.kr). Contact Education Research Team, Heesu Choi(hschoi12@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7754)

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  • Call for Applications to the Regular Course 2018

    Call for Applications to the Regular Course The LTI Korea Translation Academy offers several exciting courses for aspiring translators of Korean literature. Designed for people deeply interested in translating Korean literature, the Regular Course was earlier offered as a one-year program. With the vision of transforming the Academy into a graduate school of translation, we expanded it into a two-year program in 2015. We are looking for talented applicants who will rise to the challenge of translating Korean literature, thereby contributing to the growth of its global readership. LTI Korea Translation Academy Fellowship The fellowship is open to native speakers of English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. The fellowship is designed to allow foreign students to devote themselves fully to their study of literary translation during their stay in Korea. □ The fellowship includes: round-trip airfare, monthly stipend of 1.6 million won, visa sponsorship, health insurance, and tuition waiver □ About the Program ○ Languages: English, French, German, Russian, Spanish ○ Eligibility - Foreigners and overseas Koreans with a bachelors degree or above can apply. However, students who are recommended by their university or by a relevant expert can apply regardless of their academic background. - Applicants who are not involved in any economic activities in Korea when the course starts (September 2018). - Fellowship recipients are ineligible to receive scholarships offered by other organizations while studying at the Academy. ○ Number of Fellowships: 34 for each language ○ Curriculum: Translation of Literary Texts, Study of Translation Styles, Korean Literature, Korean Culture, Korean Language - The program also offers activities such as workshops with Korean writers and cultural excursions. ○ Faculty: Professors of literature, literary translation, and Korean language and culture ○ Duration: September 2018 June 2020 - 1st Year: September 2018 June 2019 - 2nd Year: September 2019 June 2020 ※ Fall Semester: September December | Spring Semester: March June □ How to Apply ○ Application Documents - Application form, personal statement written in Korean - Letter of recommendation: The recommender should email us directly at academy@klti.or.kr. The letter should be written in Korean or English. - Sample translation of 최은영 「601, 602」,『제17회 황순원 문학상 수상작품집』(다산책방, 2018) From the 1st line of p.259 (starting with 우리 가족은) to the 4th line of p.263 (ending in 그리고 나에게도.). The title must also be translated. - A certificate of bachelors degree, or, if not holding a degree, a letter of recommendation from a relevant expert (prescribed form). Applicants currently enrolled in a university must submit a certificate of enrollment and transcripts. ※ The prescribed forms can be downloaded from the notice section of our website: LTIKorea.or.kr/en. The application form needs to be filled online in Korean. ※ Applicants to the fellowship resident outside Korea can email us for the Korean text for the sample translation: academy@klti.or.kr. ※ Scanned copies of postgraduate certificates must be submitted (certificates in languages other than Korean or English need to be translated into either Korean or English and notarized or apostilled). □ Selection Criteria ○ Application review, sample translation review, and telephone interview ○ Applications can be made online at: http://lms.ltikorea.or.kr ○ Applications should be received no later than 16:00 (Korean standard time) on May 2, 2018. □ Selection process ○ Application period: April 1 May 2, 2018 ○ Announcement of candidates for telephone interview: May 24, 2018 ○ Telephone interview: May 28 June 1, 2018 ○ Final result announcement: June 18, 2018 Contact: Ms. Lee, Mina (academy@klti.or.kr)

    News & Media > Notice

  • Call for Applications to the Regular Course 2018

    Call for Applications to the Regular Course The LTI Korea Translation Academy offers several exciting courses for aspiring translators of Korean literature. Designed for people deeply interested in translating Korean literature, the Regular Course was earlier offered as a one-year program. With the vision of transforming the Academy into a graduate school of translation, we expanded it into a two-year program in 2015. We are looking for talented applicants who will rise to the challenge of translating Korean literature, thereby contributing to the growth of its global readership. LTI Korea Translation Academy Fellowship The fellowship is open to native speakers of English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. The fellowship is designed to allow foreign students to devote themselves fully to their study of literary translation during their stay in Korea. □ The fellowship includes: round-trip airfare, monthly stipend of 1.6 million won, visa sponsorship, health insurance, and tuition waiver □ About the Program ○ Languages: English, French, German, Russian, Spanish ○ Eligibility - Foreigners and overseas Koreans with a bachelors degree or above can apply. However, students who are recommended by their university or by a relevant expert can apply regardless of their academic background. - Applicants who are not involved in any economic activities in Korea when the course starts (September 2018). - Fellowship recipients are ineligible to receive scholarships offered by other organizations while studying at the Academy. ○ Number of Fellowships: 34 for each language ○ Curriculum: Translation of Literary Texts, Study of Translation Styles, Korean Literature, Korean Culture, Korean Language - The program also offers activities such as workshops with Korean writers and cultural excursions. ○ Faculty: Professors of literature, literary translation, and Korean language and culture ○ Duration: September 2018 June 2020 - 1st Year: September 2018 June 2019 - 2nd Year: September 2019 June 2020 ※ Fall Semester: September December | Spring Semester: March June □ How to Apply ○ Application Documents - Application form, personal statement written in Korean - Letter of recommendation: The recommender should email us directly at academy@klti.or.kr. The letter should be written in Korean or English. - Sample translation of 최은영 「601, 602」,『제17회 황순원 문학상 수상작품집』(다산책방, 2018) From the 1st line of p.259 (starting with 우리 가족은) to the 4th line of p.263 (ending in 그리고 나에게도.). The title must also be translated. - A certificate of bachelors degree, or, if not holding a degree, a letter of recommendation from a relevant expert (prescribed form). Applicants currently enrolled in a university must submit a certificate of enrollment and transcripts. ※ The prescribed forms can be downloaded from the notice section of our website: LTIKorea.or.kr/en. The application form needs to be filled online in Korean. ※ Applicants to the fellowship resident outside Korea can email us for the Korean text for the sample translation: academy@klti.or.kr. ※ Scanned copies of postgraduate certificates must be submitted (certificates in languages other than Korean or English need to be translated into either Korean or English and notarized or apostilled). □ Selection Criteria ○ Application review, sample translation review, and telephone interview ○ Applications can be made online at: http://lms.ltikorea.or.kr ○ Applications should be received no later than 16:00 (Korean standard time) on May 2, 2018. □ Selection process ○ Application period: April 1 May 2, 2018 ○ Announcement of candidates for telephone interview: May 24, 2018 ○ Telephone interview: May 28 June 1, 2018 ○ Final result announcement: June 18, 2018 Contact: Ms. Lee, Mina (academy@klti.or.kr)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.31

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.30

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.29

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  • Vol.38 (English)

    Vol.38 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.28

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  • Overseas Translation Workshop Program for 2018

    Overseas Translation Workshop Program for 2018 LTI Korea organizes translation workshops at prestigious foreign universities with Korean literature or Korean studies programs to help foster and encourage potential translators of Korean literature. We are now accepting applications to the program for 2018. 1. Target Language: All languages 2. Number of Recipients: around 7 universities ※ The number of recipients can differ depending on circumstances. 3. Eligibility Universities with faculties who can guide the translation of the Korean short-story or poem into the target language and at least 5 bachelors or masters students with sufficient proficiency in Korean to be able to translate it. 4. Grant Details: Faculty fees, Coordinator fees, Running costs 1) Funding to organize a translation workshop in which students meet once a week for 12 weeks to translate a Korean short-story or poem. 2) Funding to invite the author of the story/poem to participate in a 2 ~ 3day translation session with the participants of the workshop. ※ The University is responsible for planning and organizing the workshop. ※ Workshop scheduled for the first half of 2018 will be given preference. 5. Grant Amount 1) Around USD 6,000 to cover faculty and coordinator fees, and running costs. The exact amount will be decided after application review. 2) Additional subsidy for the writers honorarium, airfare, and hotel charges. 3) Applications can be made in the local currency. 6. Required Documents 1) An official application form, in either Korean or English, containing detailed information about the desired grant amount, the workhops schedule, the overseeing department, participating students, the writer, and the story to be translated. 2) Resumes and personal statements of the participating faculties in either Korean or English(no set format). ※ The text should be by a living writer, but must not have been previously translated in the target language. ※ Submitted documents will not be returned. 7. Selction Criteria 1) The applying universitys ability to organize workshop for Korean literature: the faculties experience in translating Korean literature and Korean language proficiency of the students. 2) The Applying universitys interest towards Korean literature and the ability to carry out the workshop enthusiastically. 8. How to Apply: Application should be emailed to academy@klti.or.kr 9. Application Deadline: December 31(Sun), 2017(Korean standard time) 10. Notification: Mid January 2018

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.27

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  • Vol.37 (English)

    Vol.37 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.25

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.26

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  • Vol.36 (English)

    Vol.36 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.24

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.23

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  • The 16th International Workshop for Translation and Publication of Korean Literature

    The 16th International Workshop for Translation and Publication of Korean Literature will be held on June 15, 2017 under the theme: Cooperation and Expertise Sharing among Cultural Institutions at Coex Conference Room 327. LTI Korea eagerly looks forward to your participation and support. Contact Cultural Exchange Public Relations Team : Sewon Lee (02-6919-7721 / sewonlee@klti.or.kr)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.22

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.21

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  • Vol.35 (English)

    Vol.35 (English)

    Archive > Published Materials > Korean Literature Now

  • Call for 2017 Translators in Residence

    2017 Translator-in-Residence The LTI Korea hosts 2017 Translator-in-Residence program to offer the very best translators from abroad the opportunity to come face to face with the flow of Korean literary and creative culture and gain a deeper understanding of Korean literature. The experience is intended to facilitate the production of truly outstanding translations. Target Participants (Qualifications) Translators, scholars and other translation/publication professionals residing overseas who meet one of the following conditions: - Has had at least 1 translated work (literature/culture/arts) published overseas - Has been the recipient of a Korean or international prize for the translation of a Korean literary, cultural or artistic text - Has made a significant contribution to the dissemination of Korean literature overseas Support Offered - Financial Support: Living expenses (1.5 million KRW/30 days) and return airfare, accommodation - Activities Provided: meetings between translators and writers, literary tours, translations seminars, etc. Program Period: July 2017 February 2018 ※ This program will operate temporarily for the year 2017 Length of Stay: 30 days within the program period Applicants are asked to submit the following documents by email (hschoi12@klti.or.kr): 1) Residency program application form (fixed format, can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) 2) Personal statement (any format, around 3 pages of A4) 3) Translation research activity proposal (any format, around 4 pages of A4) 4) Agreement to the collection of personal information (can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website) APPLICATION DEADLINE: MAY 17th 18:00 KST Selection Announcement: Applicants will be notified of their status in June. The list of successful candidates will also be put up on the LTI Korea website (http://www.ltikorea.or.kr). Contact Cultural Exchange Public Relations Team, Heesu Choi(hschoi12@klti.or.kr / +82-2-6919-7722)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.20

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  • E-Book Versions of 33 Translated Classic and Modern Works of Korean Literature to be Produced

    The Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea, President: Kim Seong-Kon, professor Emeritus at Seoul National University) is producing E-book versions of 33 translated classic and modern works of Korean literature from 1890 and on. The 33 works include 28 completed translations of Korean classics and five independently published works whose translations were assisted by the LTIs translation support grant. The 28 classics were selected based on their significance in the history of Korean literature in translation. The classics include 10 works whose copyrights have expired. The rest will be published in agreement with their respective copyright holders. The five independently published works are completed translations that have not yet been published overseas, and have received LTI Koreas translation support grant. The 28-book collection of classics, entitled The Digital Library of Korean Classics, includes Printemps Parfum (E. Dentu, 1892, translated by Hong Tjyong-Ou and J. H. Rosny), the first work of Korean literature to be introduced overseas, and The Cloud Dream of the Nine (D. OConnor, 1922, translated by James A. Gale). James A. Gale, the first to translate The Cloud Dream of the Nine into English, was a Canadian missionary who came to Korea (then Joseon) in 1888. He also translated Korean works such as Chunhyangjeon and other folktales from Joseon into English, actively promoting Korean culture, language, and customs in the West. Other translated works in the E-book collection include Korean Fairy Tales (Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1922, translated by William Elliot Griffis), Memoirs of a Korean Queen (Kegan Paul International, 1985, translated by Choe-Wall Yang-hi), Lives of Eminent Korean Monks: The Haedong Koseun Chun (Harvard University Asia Center, 1969, translated by Peter H. Lee), The Classical Poetry of Korea (Korean Culture Arts Foundation, 1981, translated by Kevin ORourke), and Der Mond gespiegelt in tausend Flssen (Sohaksa Verlag, 2002, translated by Werner Sasse and An Jung-hee), which was recently designated a national treasure. The classics will be greeting global audiences in this new format. The five independently published works include two classics and three modern works of literature. The classics are Classical Writings of Korean Women (Kim Keum Won et al., translated by Kyung-nyun Kim Richards and Steffen F. Richards) and The History of Korean Literature (Ko Mi Sook, Jung Min, Jung Byung Sul, translated by Michael J. Pettid and Kil Cha). Japanese literature in translation was introduced into the English-speaking world starting in the 1980s and 90s with introductory texts to Japanese literature, and LTI Korea expects a similar effect with the introduction of classic Korean literature to the West in the E-book format. The three modern works of Korean literature being published in E-book format are The House of Pomegranate Trees (Hahn Moo-Sook, translated by Jin-Young Choi and Suzanne Newton), A Trip Through the Mirror (Kim Joo-young, translated by Jeong-il Moon and Philip McElroy), and Chocolate Friend and Other Stories (Han Malsook, translated by Suzanne Crowder Han et al.). Last October, LTI Korea hosted the 15th International Korean Literature Translation and Publication Workshop, exploring ways to translate and share classic Korean literature in a globalized world with experts from relevant fields in attendance. Greg Newby, CEO of Project Gutenberg, emphasized in his keynote speech the significance of the convergence of classic works and new media. Project Gutenbergs mission is to distribute classic literature around the world for free via the Internet and E-books. The project is just one example of ways in which classics can be preserved and shared in the modern age. The Digital Library of Korean Classics and the other E-books can be found on multiple platforms: - The LTI Korea Librarys Digital Library of Korean Literature:http://library.klti.or.kr/taxonomy/term/28215 - Books on Google Play:https://play.google.com/store/search?q=literature+translation+institute+of+koreac=books - Internet Archive:https://archive.org/search.php?query=The%20Digital%20Library%20of%20Korean%20Classics - Open Library:https://openlibrary.org/publishers/Literature_Translation_Institute_of_Korea - Free-eBooks:https://www.free-ebooks.net/search/Digital+Library+of+Korean+Classics+/1?sort_by=relevancetimeframe=alltimecategory=any - Apple iTunes: Accessible via the iBooks application LTI Korea hopes that the publication of these E-books will allow Korean classics to reach scholars and translators of Korean literature and readers all around the world in even more convenient ways than ever before. The LTI will continue to produce E-books of works of Korean literature, regardless of their significance in the history of the field, thereby boosting accessibility to Korean literature for foreign publishers and strengthening promotional efforts globally.

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  • Poet Ko Un Conferred Fondazione Roma International Poet Award

    Poet Ko Un Conferred Fondazione Roma International Poet Award On February 3rd (local time), the Poet Ko Un was awarded the Fondazione Roma International Poet Award at the Temple of Hadrian. ▲ Ko Un. (Photo ⓒSeo Heun-Kang) The Fondazione Roma is one of Italys most prominent cultural foundations, active in fields including arts and culture, education, and welfare. The foundation began granting the International Poet Award to world-famous poets starting in 2014. Ko joins the ranks of Adam Zagajewski (Poland), Jacobo Cortines (Spain), and Carol Ann Duffy (UK), becoming the first Asian poet to receive the distinction. Ko has built up his reputation as a poet in Italy in the past several years, having been named honorary professor at Ca Foscari University of Venice in 2013 and receiving the Italian NordSud International Prize for Literature the following year. He also became the first Korean to receive full membership at Milans venerable Ambrosian Academy in 2015. The Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea) provided support for the Italian translation of Kos Flowers of a Moment (Fiori dun Istante, published in 2006 by by Cafoscarina) and Poems of Ko Un (LIsola che canta, published in 2009 by LietoColle). As of 2017, more of his works, including the Swedish and Slovenian versions of Ko Un Anthology, the French version of First Person Sorrowful, the Spanish version of Flowers of a Moment, the Chinese version of What?, and the Russian version of Empty Space are awaiting translation or publication. ▲ The Italian covers of Kos work. From left: Poems of Ko Un, What?, Flowers of an Instant. ▲ Ko Un at the Temple of Hadrian, where the International Poet Award Ceremony was held. ▲ Ko Uns works on display at the book room in the Temple of Hadrian LTI Korea has published 28 works of Korean literature in Italy, and is preparing 14 more for translation and publication. The Institute plans to use Kos distinction as a bridgehead as it steps up its introduction of Korean literature into the Italian market.

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  • International Praise for LTI Korea-Supported Works by Pyun Hye Young, Han Kang, Bae Suah, Including Book of the Year 2016

    Ashes and Red named Polands Book of the Year 2016 Granice.pl, a Polish online literature community named Pyun Hye Youngs novel Ashes and Red, published in Poland with the translation and publication support grant from the Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea, President: Kim Seong-Kon, professor Emeritus at Seoul National University), Book of the Year 2016 (Najlepsza książka roku 2016). The distinction goes out every year to one book in the adult and childrens categories, and 2016 marks the first year that a Korean novel was named for the adult book category. In the childrens category, Hwang Sun-mis The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly was named Book of the Year 2012. That the community names a Book of the Year from both local and translated international publications shows the significance of the distinction awarded Pyuns novel. ▲ The Polish cover of Ashes and Red. The Book of the Year (Najlepsza książka roku) distinction is considered a reliable metric of a books success, as it is awarded based on votes from readers and input from prominent local media and literary magazines. Books are first nominated by online reader polls, and narrowed down to a shortlist of one book per release quarter. Then, one of the four nominees is awarded the distinction at the end of the year. Ashes and Red was voted the top book of the 2016 winter season, becoming shortlisted for Book of the Year 2016 (Najlepsza książka roku 2016). It was then evaluated by an external panel of judges composed of literary critics, who finally granted it the distinction. Judges commented that Ashes and Red was a work that evokes the styles of Camus and Franz Kafka in their discussions of the unjust nature of human life, and that Ashes and Red was the most interesting book published in 2016. Released by publishing house Kwiaty Orientu and translated personally by its founder Marzena Stefanska, the novel has also been shortlisted for the distinction of Translation of the Year, for which the results will be announced on April 8th. LTI Korea provided translation and publication support grants for the Polish edition of Ashes and Red, which was released in November of 2016. The publisher, Kwiaty Orientu (meaning Flower of the Orient), specializes in East Asian books. The company also received LTI Koreas support for the releases of Kin Young-has short story collection Whatever Happened to the Guy Stuck in the Elevator? in 2009 and Hwang Sok-yongs Strange Land in 2012, among other works of Korean literature. Kwiaty Orientus release of Ill be Right There by Shin Kyung-sook was also voted Book of the Season in winter of 2012. *Original link:http://www.granice.pl/kultura,oto-najlepsze-ksiazki-roku-2016,7007 Han Kang, Bae Suah Take US Literary Market by Storm The recent translations of Han Kang and Bae Suahs novels have taken the US literary market by storm. Following the 2015 and 2016 UK and US releases of Han Kangs The Vegetarian, which won last years Man Booker International Prize, The Vegetarian translator Deborah Smiths translation of the authors novel Human Acts was released in January of 2017. The English translations were published by Portobello Books in the UK and Hogarth in the US. Human Acts is garnering much attention in the US, being reviewed upon release by the New York Times. On January 10, the paper published a review entitled The Author of The Vegetarian Takes On Koreas Violent Past. The review describes the setting of the novelthe pro-democracy movement of 1980 in Gwangjualongside the characters, and writes that the novel is universally relevant and deeply resonant as it uses human violence to question the nature of humanity. *Original link:https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/10/books/review/han-kang-human-acts.html?_r=0 The US releases of Bae Suahs novels are also captivating readers. LTI Korea provided translation and publication grants to A Greater Music and Recitation, both translated by Deborah Smith. A Greater Music was published by Open Letter Books, and Recitation by Deep Vellum Publishing. Celebrating the releases of the two books, LTI Korea launched a marketing campaign all across the US last October. Bae was accompanied by translator Deborah Smith as they gave readings and met with readers in cities including New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Dallas. The English editions of A Greater Music and Recitation were made possible by LTI Koreas publisher invitation program at the end of 2014. When renowned American publishers Open Letter Books and Deep Vellum Publishing expressed interest in Baes works, LTI Korea invited the publishers to Korea and set up meetings with Korean publishers and authors. Open Letterthe Universty of Rochesters publishing house based in New York Stateand Deep Vellum, based in Dallas, Texas, both specialize in translated literature. The two publishers have signed Korean literature publication agreements with the Institute every year since. The cooperation led to the English-language publication of Jung Young Moons Vaseline Buddha early this year by Deep Vellum, and the upcoming 2018 publication of Bae Suahs The Owls Absence. Recitation is the second of Baes works to be published in the US, following A Greater Music in October of 2016. Both are ranked on Amazon.coms Asian American and Cultural Heritage bestsellers list, receiving positive reader reviews. ▲The US covers of A Greater Music and Recitations.

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  • Call for Applications to the Regular Course 2017

    Call for Applications to the Regular Course The LTI Korea Translation Academy offers several exciting courses for aspiring translators of Korean literature. Designed for people deeply interested in translating Korean literature, the Regular Course was earlier offered as a one-year program. With the vision of transforming the Academy into a graduate school of translation, we expanded it into a two-year program in 2015. We are looking for talented applicants who will rise to the challenge of translating Korean literature, thereby contributing to the growth of its global readership. LTI Korea Translation Academy Fellowship The fellowship is open to native speakers of English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. The fellowship is designed to allow foreign students to devote themselves fully to their study of literary translation during their stay in Korea. □ The fellowship includes: round-trip airfare, monthly stipend of 1.6 million won, visa sponsorship, health insurance, and tuition waiver □ About the Program ○ Languages: English, French, German, Russian, Spanish ○ Eligibility - Foreigners and overseas Koreans with a bachelors degree or above can apply. However, students who are recommended by their university or by a relevant expert can apply regardless of their academic background. - Applicants who are not involved in any economic activities in Korea when the course starts (September 2017). - Fellowship recipients are ineligible to receive scholarships offered by other organizations while studying at the Academy. ○ Number of Fellowships: 3〜4 for each language ○ Curriculum: Translation of Literary Texts, Study of Translation Styles, Korean Literature, Korean Culture, Korean Language - The program also offers activities such as workshops with Korean writers and cultural excursions. ○ Faculty: Professors of literature, translation, and Korean language and culture ○ Duration: September 2017 〜 June 2019 - 1st Year: September 2017 〜 June 2018 - 2nd Year: September 2018 〜 June 2019 ※ Fall Semester: September 〜 December | Spring Semester: March 〜 June □ How to Apply ○ Application Documents - Application form, personal statement written in Korean - Letter of recommendation: The recommender should email us directly at academy@klti.or.kr. The letter should be written in Korean or English. - Sample translation of 이기호 「최미진은 어디로」,『2017 제62회 현대문학상 수상소설집』(현대문학, 2016) p.150 6th line(그날 밤, 나는 평소보다〜) 〜 p.155 8th line(〜따로 건네지 않았다.) The title must be translated as well. - A certificate of bachelors degree, or, if not holding a degree, a letter of recommendation from a relevant expert (prescribed form). However, applicants enrolled in a university must submit a certificate of enrollment and transcripts. ※ All forms, including the personal statement, and letter of recommendation, can be downloaded from the LTI Korea website. - http://www.ltikorea.or.kr/en/ - http://ltikorea.org □ Selection Criteria ○ Application review, sample translation review and telephone interview ○ Applications can be made online at: http://lms.ltikorea.or.kr ○ Applications should be received no later than 24:00 (Korean standard time) on April 30, 2017. □ Selection process ○ Application period: April 1 〜 30, 2017 ○ Announcement of candidates for telephone interview: May 31, 2017 ○ Telephone interview: June 2 〜 13, 2017 ○ Final result announcement: June 19, 2017 Contact: Ms. Lee, Mina (Tel: +82-2-6919-7752 | E-mail: academy@klti.or.kr)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.19

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.18

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  • Vol.34 (English)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.14

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  • Vol.32 (English)

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  • Vol.31(English)

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  • LTI Korea Newsletter No.4

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  • Vol.30 (English)

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  • Vol.29 (English)

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  • Vol.27 (English)

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  • LTI Korea Releases 30 New E-books

    LTI Korea Releases 30 New E-books ■ LTI Korea has published English translations of 30 Korean literary works from 1910 to 1950 as part of its 20th Century Korean Literature e-book series, adding to the 20 e-books it published last year. Works of 18 Korean writers like Kang Kyung-ae, Kye Yong-muk, Kim Dong-in, Kim Sa-ryang and others are included in the list of e-books. For the first time, stories penned by Kye Yong-muk, Na Hye-seok, Shin Chae-ho, Yang Geon-sik, Yun Gi-jeong, Lee Mu-young, Yi Ik-sang, Jeong In-ta and Choi Seo-hae are also included in this collection. ■ The stories were picked from a list of works in the public domain provided by the Korea Copyright Commission keeping in mind factors like the work’s readability and potential to generate interest among foreign readers, literary significance and so on. The e-books can be downloaded for free from the Apple App Store or Google Play by searching for “20th Century Korean Literature.” They can also be accessed at LTI Korea’s e-book site (ebook.klti.or.kr). ■ List of Works: 작가명 Writer 작품명 Title 강경애 Kang Kyung-ae 모자 Mother and Child 계용묵 Kye Yong-muk 별을 헨다, 병풍에 그린 닭이, 인두지주 Counting Stars, Like a Chicken on a Folding Screen, The Human Arachnid 김동인 Kim Dong-in 발가락이 닮았다, 명문 Our Toes Are Alike, Clear Commandments 김사량 Kim Sa-ryang 유치장에서 만난 사나이, 토성랑 The Man I Met in the Lock Up, Toseongnang 김유정 Kim Yu-jeong 소낙비, 만무방 Downpour, Scoundrels 나도향 Na Do-hyang 지형근, 뽕The Downfall of Ji Hyeong-geun, Mulberry 나혜석 Na Hye-seok 규원 Bitterness of the Inner Quarters 신채호 Shin Chae-ho 꿈하늘 Dream Sky 양건식 Yang Geon-sik 슬픈 모순 Sad Contradiction 윤기정 Yun Gi-jeong 양회굴뚝 The Smokestack 이무영 Lee Mu-young 제1과 제1장 Act 1. Scene 1 이상 Yi Sang 지도의 암실 The Darkroom of the Map 이익상 Yi Ik-sang 쫓기어가는 이들, 흙의 세례 The Banished, Baptism of Soil 이효석 Lee Hyoseok 개살구, 장미 병들다 Wild Apricots, The Sick Rose 정인택 Jeong In-taek 여수 Longing for Home 조명희 Cho Myung-hee 저기압, 땅 속으로 Low Pressure Point, Into the Ground 채만식 Ch’ae Man-Sik 쑥국새, 세길로 The Cuckoo, Three Paths 최서해 Choi Seo-hae 고국, 기아와 살육, 토혈 Homeland, Hunger and Slaughter, Consumption

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  • Vol.26 (English)

    Vol.26 (English)

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  • Five New Titles in the Library of Korean Literature Series

    ○ Five new titles in the Library of Korean Literature series, jointly published by Dalkey Archive Press and LTI Korea, were released on 14 October. ○ LTI Korea signed a MOU with Dalkey Archive Press in October, 2011 with the objective of publishing 25 Korean literary works in English translation. The first batch of ten books was published in November last year. The five titles published this fall include Pavane for a Dead Princess by Park Min-gyu, The Square by Choi In-hun, Scenes from the Enlightenment by Kim Namcheon, Another Mans City by Choe In-ho and The Republic of Užupis by Halji. Except for The Square, this marks the first time that these works have been introduced to the English-speaking world. ○ The third batch of five books is slated to be released in the second half of next year. It is hoped that this series will serve as a channel for introducing diverse aspects of Korean literature to the English-speaking book market. ○ Dalkey Archive Press releases 50 titles every year and has published over 500 books since it was established in 1984. It is headquartered in Champaign, Illinois and has branch offices in London and Dublin. It is one of the most significant literary publishers in the U.S. and contributes substantially to the publication of English and international literary works with outstanding literary and artistic merit. ○ List of titles in the first batch: Author Title Yi Kwang-su The Soil Kim Won-il The House with a Sunken Courtyard Park Wan-Suh Lonesome You Hyun Ki Young One Spoon on this Earth Kim Joo-young Stingray Lee Kiho At Least We Can Apologize Jung Young Moon A Most Ambiguous Sunday Jung Mikyung My Sons Girlfriend Jang Jung-il When Adam Opens His Eyes Jang Eunjin No One Writes Back Overview of Dalkey Archive Press Dalkey Archive Press is one of the leading literary publishers in the English-speaking book market. Since its establishment in 1984, Dalkey Archive Press has published over 500 books, releasing 50 titles each year. It has its headquarters in Champaign, Illinois and branch offices in London and Dublin. It has its origins in the Review of Contemporary Fiction, a journal started by its founder John OBrien in 1981. The journal was begun with the purpose of creating or revitalizing critical discourse on non-commercial English authors ignored by the critical establishment. The authors covered in the early issues of the journal included William S. Burroughs, Paul Metcalf, Gilbert Sorrentino, Georges Perec and Robert Walser. The journal also covered fiction from various countries including China, Finland, Belgium, Italy, and Australia. With the flow of time, the objective of the company expanded to include the publication of out-of-print books that major publishers had stopped publishing. Later on, it expanded even further to include translations of world literature. At present, the share of works of translation in the US publishing market is a mere 3%, making market penetration extremely difficult. However, this was not always the case. Even until the 1970s, works of famous non-English authors were published by prominent and influential publishers like Avon, Dutton, and McGraw-Hill publishing. However, fundamental changes in the structure of commercial publishing led to foreign literature being ignored by major publishers and critical media. As a result, except for a few works of translations that enjoyed popularity, foreign literature became an overlooked genre in the English-speaking market. Dalkey Archive Press strived to have works of foreign literature with artistic merit included in the critical discourse of modern English literature. Starting with the publication of the English translation of Yves Navarres novel in 1987, it concentrated its efforts in publishing literature in translation. Dalkeys primary interest lies in works of fiction. In its initial years, it mainly published reissues of out-of-print books but now it is focuses on discovering new authors of English literature. It prefers publishing novels instead of short fiction, and works la Samuel Beckett instead of novels with typical third person realism. It also brings out publications related to literary studies, historical research, aesthetics, literary criticism and theory, and translation theory. Authors whose works have been published by Dalkey have gone on to win the Pulitzer and the Nobel Prize. The list of authors published by Dalkey reads like a list of world literature. They include authors like Camilo Jose Cela, Antonio Lobo Antunes, Nathalie Sarraute, Raymond Queneau, Djuna Barnes, Andrei Bitov, Anne Carson, Eric Chevillard, Robert Coover, Aldous Huxley, Robert Creeley, Gustave Flaubert, Max Frisch, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Lezama Lima, William H. Gass, Henry Green, G. Cabrera Infante, Danilo Kis, Mina Loy, David Markson, Claude Ollier, Flann OBrien, Patrik Ourednik, Raymond Queneau, Raymond Roussel, Arno Schmidt, Viktor Shklovsky, Gertrude Stein, Manuel Puig, and Louis Zukofsky to name but a few. Dalkey Archive Press Website: www.dalkeyarchive.com

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  • Vol.25 (English)

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  • K-Lit Review Contest on Amazon.com

    * Topic: Read Highway with Green Apples(A Short Story) bySuah Bae (Amazon link:http://goo.gl/wLUlBh) and write a 500 word review. * Eligibility: Open to all foreigners residing in and outside of Korea * How to Enter 1) Read the book :-) 2) Post your review in English on the books Amazon page (Limited to 500 words) 3) Fill the application form on the LTI Koreas facebook page * Prizes 1) Grand Prize (1 person): $500 Amazon.com Gift Card or equivalent 2) First Prize (3 persons): $100 Amazon.com Gift Card or equivalent(Each) 3) Second Prize (5 persons): $50 Amazon.com Gift Card or equivalent(Each) * Reviews will be judged by the judging panel. They will be looking for originality, content, and humor. * The winners will be announced on the LTI Koreas facebook page after 7/1/2014.

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  • Vol.24 (English)

    Vol.24 (English)

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  • Vol.23 (English)

    Vol.23 (English)

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  • Vol.22 (Chinese)

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  • Vol.22 (English)

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  • Library of Korean Literature Published by Dalkey Archive Press

    Ten titles from the Library of Korean Literature are slated to be published by Dalkey Archive Press. The official U.S. release date is Saturday, November 16. This is a noteworthy accomplishment since translated books make up only 2% of the entire U.S. market. These ten titles draw from major works of Korean modern and contemporary literature. Author Title Yi Kwang-su The Soil Kim Won-il The House with a Sunken Courtyard Park Wan-Suh Lonesome You Hyun Ki Young One Spoon on This Earth Kim Joo-young Stingray Lee Kiho At Least We Can Apologize Jung Young Moon A Most Ambiguous Sunday Jung Mikyung My Son's Girlfriend Jang Jung-il When Adam Opens His Eyes Jang Eunjin No One Writes Back This publication is phase one in the November 2011 MOU between LTI Korea and Dalkey Archive Press which calls for 25 books in total. The second batch of books includes Kim Namch'on'sTaeha: Collection of Late Short Stories, Yi Sang's Short Story Collection, Choi In-hun's The Square,Haïlji's The Republic of Užupis. They are expected to be published in the fall of 2014, leading to an overall increase in the size and diversity of Korean literature in the United States. Dalkey Archive Press releases 50 titles every year and has published over 500 books since it was established in 1984. It is headquartered in Champaign, Illinois and has branch offices in London and Dublin. Dalkey Archive Press is one of the most significant literary publishers in the U.S., substantially contributing to the publication of English and international literature.

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  • Vol.21 (Chinese)

    Vol.21 (Chinese)

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    Vol.21 (English)

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  • Vol.20 (Chinese)

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  • Publication of list_Books from Korea vol.19

    The 2013 spring edition of list_Books from Korea, LTI Korea’s periodical for international readers, has been issued in both English and Chinese. list vol. 19 features Korean non-fiction children’s books and aims to promote a greater circulation of them before the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. Both informative and entertaining, Korea’s non-fiction children’s books fall into four categories: cartoons, series, narratives, and illustrated books. Interviews with award-winning novelist Jung Young Moon, winner of three literary awards last year, and with Lee Woo-il, a celebrated graphic novelist with unique illustrations, provide windows into their literary worlds. list also features Segyesa Publishing, reviews on new releases, and more than 50 publisher recommended titles. This issue of list delivers recent news on Korean publishing trends and copyright information for overseas publishers. The exposé on Seoul’s art galleries and musicals provides a new view of the city’s hidden features, facilitating international understanding and stimulating cultural sensibilities.

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  • Korean Literature in the Global Age -- A Conversation with Yi Mun-Yol --

    The Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea) is sponsoring major novelist Yi Mun-Yol’s visit to the U.S. (March 8th -11th). Yi Mun-Yol will attend an academic symposium at the Sejong Cultural Society, where he will have a chance to interact with his readers in the U.S. Theodore Hughes (Professor of Korean literature, Columbia University) and John O’Brien (Senior editor, Dalkey Archive Press) will speak at the Korean Literature in the Global Age Symposium on Friday March 8th, and Yi Mun-Yol will be a panelist. Yi Mun-Yol’s Literature Concert is scheduled to be held the following day (Saturday March 9th), which is open to the general public. Yi will speak about the current state of Korean culture and literature. Yi Mun-Yol’s novella Our Twisted Hero (Hyperion, 2001) has been selected as the set text for the 2013 Korean Literature Essay Competition, held by LTI Korea and the Sejong Cultural Society. Many high school English teachers have included Our Twisted Hero in their classes. This year nearly 1,000 contestants have entered the competition in the U.S. and Canada, demonstrating high interest in Korean literature. The winning essay will be published in Harvard University’s Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature Culture. Yi Mun-Yol’s The Poet (Harvill, 1955) and The Song Of Songs: The Dim Shadow Of A Bygone Love were translated into English with support from LTI Korea. Our Twisted Hero will be republished in The Library of Korea by Dalkey Archive Press.

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  • Vol.Special (English)

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  • Vol.12(Chinese)

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  • Vol.9 (Chinese)

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  • Vol.1 (English)

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